1887

Abstract

For an effective T-cell activation and response, co-stimulation is required in addition to the antigen-specific signal from their antigen receptors. The CD2/CD58 interaction is considered as one of the most important T-cell co-stimulatory pathways for T-cell activation and proliferation, and its role in regulating intestinal T-cell function in acute and chronic SIV -infected macaques is poorly documented. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of CD58 expression in both T- and B-cell populations during acute SIV infection along with high plasma viral load and a loss of intestinal CD4 T cells compared to SIV-uninfected control macaques. The reduction of CD58 expression in T cells was correlated with the reduced expression of T-cell-mediated IL-2 and TNFα production. Together, these results indicate that reduction in the CD2/CD58 interaction pathway in mucosal lymphocytes might play a crucial role in mucosal T-cell dysfunction during acute SIV/HIV infection.

Keyword(s): CD2 , CD58 , cytokine , mucosal immunology and SIV
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2018-11-29
2019-12-11
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