1887

Abstract

The emergence and rapid spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas has prompted the development of in vitro and in vivo models to understand several aspects of ZIKV biology and boost the development of vaccines and antivirals. In vitro model studies include reverse genetics systems, two-dimensional (2D) cell models, such as primary cells and cell lines, and ex vivo three-dimensional (3D) models derived from skin, brain and placenta. While these models are cost-effective and allow rigorous control of experimental variables, they do not always recapitulate in vivo scenarios. Thus, a number of in vivo models have been developed, including mosquitoes (Aedes sp. and Culex sp.), embryonated chicken eggs, immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice strains, hamsters, guinea pigs, conventional swine and non-human primates. In this review, we summarize the main research systems that have been developed in recent years and discuss their advantages, limitations and main applications.

Keyword(s): animal models , ex vivo , in vitro , in vivo and ZIKV
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2018-10-16
2019-10-18
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