1887

Abstract

Herpesviruses have a lifecycle consisting of successive lytic, latent and reactivation phases. Only three infected cell proteins (ICPs) have been described for the oncogenic Marek’s disease virus (or Gallid herpes virus 2, GaHV-2): ICP4, ICP22 and ICP27. We focus here on ICP22, confirming its cytoplasmic location and showing that ICP22 is expressed during productive phases of the lifecycle, via a bicistronic transcript encompassing the US10 gene. We also identified the unique promoter controlling ICP22 expression, and its core promoter, containing functional responsive elements including E-box, ETS-1 and GATA elements involved in ICP22 transactivation. ICP22 gene expression was weakly regulated by DNA methylation and activated by ICP4 or ICP27 proteins. We also investigated the function of GaHV-2 ICP22. We found that this protein repressed transcription from its own promoter and from those of IE ICP4 and ICP27, and the late gK promoter. Finally, we investigated posttranscriptional ICP22 regulation by GaHV-2 microRNAs. We found that mdv1-miR-M5-3p and -M1-5p downregulated ICP22 mRNA expression during latency, whereas, unexpectedly, mdv1-miR-M4-5p upregulated the expression of the protein ICP22, indicating a tight regulation of ICP22 expression by microRNAs.

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2018-08-01
2019-12-05
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