1887

Abstract

The Chrysoviridae is a family of small, isometric, non-enveloped viruses (40 nm in diameter) with segmented dsRNA genomes (typically four segments). The genome segments are individually encapsidated and together comprise 11.5–12.8 kbp. The single genus Chrysovirus includes nine species. Chrysoviruses lack an extracellular phase to their life cycle; they are transmitted via intracellular routes within an individual during hyphal growth, in asexual or sexual spores, or between individuals via hyphal anastomosis. There are no known natural vectors for chrysoviruses. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of the Chrysoviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/chrysoviridae.

Erratum
An erratum has been published for this content:
Corrigendum: ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Chrysoviridae
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2017-12-18
2019-08-23
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