1887

Abstract

Since 1999, 11 serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV) similar to Central American or Caribbean strains have been isolated in the southeastern United States, predominantly in Florida. The majority of the incursive serotypes have remained restricted to the southeastern US. In recent years, BTV serotype 3 (BTV-3) has been isolated in areas increasingly distant from Florida. The current study uses whole genome sequencing of recent and historical BTV-3 isolates from the US, Central America and the Caribbean with additional sequences from GenBank to conduct phylogenetic analyses. The individual segments of the BTV genome were analysed to determine if recent BTV-3 isolates are reassortants containing genomic segments from endemic US serotypes or if they retain a majority of Central American/Caribbean genotypes. The analyses indicate that BTV-3 isolates Mississippi 2006, Arkansas 2008 and Mississippi 2009 are closely related reassortants that contain five to six genomic segments that are of US origin and two to three segments of Central American/Caribbean origin. In contrast, the BTV-3 South Dakota 2012 isolate contains seven genomic segments that are more similar to isolates from Central American and the Caribbean. These different evolutionary histories of the BTV-3 isolates suggest that there are at least two different lineages of BTV-3 that are currently circulating in the US.

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2017-11-09
2019-10-22
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