1887

Abstract

Persistent propagative viruses maintain intricate interactions with their arthropod vectors. In this study, we investigated the transcriptome-level responses associated with a persistent propagative phytovirus infection in various life stages of its vector using an Illumina HiSeq sequencing platform. The pathosystem components included a Tospovirus, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), its insect vector, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), and a plant host, Arachis hypogaea (L.). We assembled (de novo) reads from three developmental stage groups of virus-exposed and non-virus-exposed F. fusca into one transcriptome consisting of 72 366 contigs and identified 1161 differentially expressed (DE) contigs. The number of DE contigs was greatest in adults (female) (562) when compared with larvae (first and second instars) (395) and pupae (pre- and pupae) (204). Upregulated contigs in virus-exposed thrips had blastx annotations associated with intracellular transport and virus replication. Upregulated contigs were also assigned blastx annotations associated with immune responses, including apoptosis and phagocytosis. In virus-exposed larvae, Blast2GO analysis identified functional groups, such as multicellular development with downregulated contigs, while reproduction, embryo development and growth were identified with upregulated contigs in virus-exposed adults. This study provides insights into differences in transcriptome-level responses modulated by TSWV in various life stages of an important vector, F. fusca.

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2017-07-26
2019-09-18
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