1887

Abstract

In recent years, several entry mediators have been characterized for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). Porcine sialoadhesin [pSn, also known as sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-type lectin (Siglec-1)] and porcine CD163 (pCD163) have been identified as the most important host entry mediators that can fully coordinate PRRSV infection into macrophages. However, recent isolates have not only shown a tropism for sialoadhesin-positive cells, but also for sialoadhesin-negative cells. This observation might be partly explained by the existence of additional receptors that can support PRRSV binding and entry. In the search for new receptors, recently identified porcine Siglecs (Siglec-3, Siglec-5 and Siglec-10), members of the same family as sialoadhesin, were cloned and characterized. Only Siglec-10 was able to significantly improve PRRSV infection and production in a CD163-transfected cell line. Compared with sialoadhesin, Siglec-10 performed equally effectively as a receptor for PRRSV type 2 strain MN-184, but it was less capable of supporting infection with PRRSV type 1 strain LV (Lelystad virus). Siglec-10 was demonstrated to be involved in the endocytosis of PRRSV, confirming the important role of Siglec-10 in the entry process of PRRSV. In conclusion, it can be stated that PRRSV may use several Siglecs to enter macrophages, which may explain the strain differences in the pathogenesis.

Keyword(s): PRRSV , receptor and siglecs
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2017-07-26
2019-09-18
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