1887

Abstract

Proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is suspected to modulate the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative conditions. We previously described delayed onset of clinical symptoms and prolonged survival of PAR2-deficient mice after intracerebral inoculation with prions. Here we report the results from a refined blinded study that aimed to investigate the effects of PAR2 deletion on scrapie pathogenesis after peripheral infection. This study failed to confirm that PAR2 deficiency impacts on the length of the incubation period, with PAR2 and PAR2 littermates developing scrapie at the same time. To clarify the discrepancy between the two observations, we repeated the intracerebral inoculation study while utilizing our refined protocol, which aimed to limit possible sources of experimental bias. The study again failed to confirm the significant effect of PAR2 expression on the course of prion infection. Our report emphasizes and discusses the importance of unbiased experimental design and the selection of proper genetic controls when using genetically altered animal models for prion pathogenesis studies.

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2017-06-14
2019-10-19
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