1887

Abstract

The genome sequence of the constricta strain of (CYDV) was determined to be 12 792 nt long and organized into seven ORFs with the gene order 3′-N-X-P-Y-M-G-L-5′, which encodes the nucleocapsid, phospho, movement, matrix, glyco, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase proteins, respectively, except for X, which is of unknown function. Cloned ORFs for each gene, except L, were used to construct a protein interaction and localization map (PILM) for this virus, which shares greater than 80 % amino acid similarity in all ORFs except X and P with the sanguinolenta strain of this species (SYDV). Protein localization patterns and interactions unique to each viral strain were identified, resulting in strain-specific PILMs. Localization of CYDV and SYDV proteins in virus-infected cells mapped subcellular loci likely to be sites of replication, morphogenesis and movement.

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2017-06-01
2021-10-20
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