1887

Abstract

Recent studies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have garnered interest for the role of CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) and its known ligands, CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) and human β-defensins, in viral entry, dissemination and antiviral immunity. Several studies have suggested that CCR6 may also act as a weak co-receptor of HIV entry, in addition to the canonical CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and CCR5. However, the pathogenic significance has yet to be demonstrated as the observations for preferential infection of CD4CCR6 over CD4CCR6 T cells appear to be independent of CCR6 expression. This indicates means for preferential infection other than CCR6 co-receptor use. Attention has also turned to the inadvertent role of the CCR6/CCL20 axis in attracting key immune cells, including TH17 cells and dendritic cells, to sites of infection and propagating the virus to other sites of the body. This review article will summarize the latest evidence that the CCR6/CCL20 chemokine axis is playing an important role in HIV pathogenesis and immunity. Further work with in vivo studies is needed to establish the biological and, hence, therapeutic significance of these findings.

Keyword(s): CCL20 , CCR6 , chemokines , co-receptors and HIV
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2017-04-01
2019-09-18
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