1887

Abstract

Chapparvoviruses are a highly divergent group of parvoviruses (family Parvoviridae) that have recently been identified via metagenomic sampling of animal faeces. Here, we report the sequences of six novel chapparvoviruses identified through both metagenomic sampling of bat tissues and in silico screening of published vertebrate genome assemblies. The novel chapparvoviruses share several distinctive genomic features and group together as a robustly supported monophyletic clade in phylogenetic trees. Our data indicate that chapparvoviruses have a broad host range in vertebrates and a global distribution.

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2017-03-13
2019-10-23
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