1887

Abstract

Epstein–Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2) is an important chemotactic receptor that is involved in proper B-cell T-cell interactions. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to upregulate this gene upon infection of cell lines, but the timing and mechanism of this upregulation, as well as its importance to EBV infection, remain unknown. This work investigated EBV’s manipulation of EBI2 expression of primary naive B cells. EBV infection induces EBI2 expression resulting in elevated levels of EBI2 after 24 h until 7 days post-infection, followed by a dramatic decline (P=0.027). Increased EBI2 expression was not found in non-specifically stimulated B cells or when irradiated virus was used. The EBV lytic gene BRRF1 exhibited a similar expression pattern to EBI2 (R =0.4622). BRRF1-deficient EBV could not induce EBI2. However, B cells transduced with BRRF1 showed elevated expression of EBI2 (P=0.042), a result that was not seen with transduction of a different EBV lytic transfection factor, BRLF1. Based on these results, we conclude that EBI2 expression is directly influenced by EBV infection and that BRRF1 is necessary and sufficient for EBI2 upregulation during infection.

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2017-03-20
2019-09-18
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