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Abstract

A -like long unique sequence was identified during transcriptome sequencing of the brown planthopper (BPH), . This unique sequence demonstrated high similarity with the whole-genome sequence of cricket paralysis virus, including 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions; thus we considered it the whole genome of a new virus. We propose that the virus be named Nilaparvata lugens C virus (NlCV). The plus-strand RNA genome spanned 9144 nt, excluding a 3′ poly(A) tail with two large ORFs encoding structural and non-structural proteins, respectively. Detection of NlCV in BPH honeydew raised the hypothesis of horizontal transmission of the virus. Honeydew from viruliferous BPHs was used to feed non-viruliferous insects, the results of which indicated that the BPH could acquire NlCV through feeding and that the virus could multiply in the insect body. A tissue-specific distribution test using real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that NlCV was mainly present in the reproductive organs, and the virus was detected in eggs laid by viruliferous female insects using nested PCR, indicating the possibility of vertical transmission as well. As no significant symptom was detected in the viruliferous BPH, NlCV is considered a new commensal virus of BPH. Interestingly, this virus was also detected in two other hemipteran insects, the white-backed planthopper and the horned gall aphid, indicating that NlCV might be present in many other hemipteran insects and have a wide host range.

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2016-03-01
2021-10-16
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