1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Four single-sporangium isolates of were inoculated on 14 different plant species to determine their ability to infect and reproduce in each host and their ability to transmit two tobacco necrosis virus isolates. Two isolates, one from lettuce and one from tomato, were able to reproduce in most hosts and transmitted both tobacco necrosis virus isolates to all hosts. By contrast, a mustard isolate reproduced in only six species and was not a vector of tobacco necrosis virus. An oat isolate reproduced in six species (three in common with the mustard) and was a poor vector, transmitting one tobacco necrosis virus isolate to only two hosts and not transmitting the other tobacco necrosis virus isolate to any host.

Zoospores of the different fungus isolates were mixed with suspensions of virus, washed, negatively stained, and examined in the electron microscope. Virus adsorbed tightly to the surface membranes (plasmalemma of the body and axonemal sheath) of zoospores of isolates that transmitted it, but not to those of the non-vector (mustard) isolate. Zoospores of the poor vector (oat) isolate adsorbed fewer particles of the tobacco necrosis virus isolate they transmitted than did those of good vectors and did not adsorb the other tobacco necrosis virus isolate. Most, but not all, of the observed specificity of transmission of tobacco necrosis virus seems to be associated with the ability or inability of zoospores to adsorb the virus on their surfaces. None of these isolates adsorbed particles of turnip yellow mosaic, tomato bushy stunt or cucumber necrosis viruses. zoospores also adsorbed satellite virus particles. Zoospores of adsorbed particles of cucumber necrosis virus, but not of tobacco necrosis virus, to their surfaces. Thus, acquisition consisted of a tight adsorption of virus to the zoospore surface membranes in each of the three known instances of this type of relationship.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-9-3-201
1970-12-01
2022-01-21
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/9/3/JV0090030201.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-9-3-201&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Campbell R. N. 1965; Weeds as reservoir hosts of the lettuce big-vein virus. Canadian Journal of Botany 43:1141
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Campbell R. N., Fry P. R. 1966; The nature of the associations between Olpidium brassicae and lettuce big-vein and tobacco necrosis viruses. Virology 29:222
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Dias H. F. 1970; Transmission of cucumber necrosis virus by Olpidium cucurbitacearum Barr & Dias. Virology 40:828
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Garrett R. G., Tomlinson J. A. 1967; Isolate differences in Olpidium brassicae. Transactions of the British Mycological Society 50:429
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Kassanis B., Macfarlane I. 1964; Transmission of tobacco necrosis virus by zoospores of Olpidium brassicae . Journal of General Microbiology 36:79
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kassanis B., Macfarlane I. 1965; Interaction of virus strain, fungus isolate, and host species in the transmission of tobacco necrosis virus. Virology 26:603
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kassanis B., Macfarlane I. 1968; The transmission of satellite viruses of tobacco necrosis virus by Olpidium brassicae . Journal of General Virology 3:227
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Lin M. T., Campbell R. N., Smith P. R., Temmink J. H. M. 1970; Lettuce big-vein virus transmission by single-sporangium isolates of Olpidium brassicae . Phytopathology (in the Press)
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Mowat W. P. 1968; Olpidium brassicae: Electrophoretic mobility of zoospores associated with their ability to transmit tobacco necrosis virus. Virology 34:565
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Sahtiyanci S. 1962; Studien iiber einige wurzelparasitare Olpidiaceen. Archiv fur Mikrobiologie 41:187
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Smith P. R., Campbell R. N., Fry P. R. 1969; Root discharge and soil survival of viruses. Phytopathology 59:1678
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Teakle D. S., Hiruki C. 1964; Vector specificity in Olpidium . Virology 24:539
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Temmink J. H. M., Campbell R. N. 1969a; The ultrastructure of Olpidium brassicae. II. Zoospores. Canadian Journal of Botany 47:227
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Temmink J. H. M., Campbell R. N. 1969b; Specific adsorption of tobacco necrosis virus particles onto zoospores of Olpidium brassicae . Phytopathology 59:1053
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Uyemoto J. K., Grogan R. G., Wakeman J. R. 1968; Selective activation of satellite virus strains by strains of tobacco necrosis virus. Virology 34:410
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-9-3-201
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-9-3-201
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error