1887

Abstract

Protective immunity to African swine fever virus (ASFV) may involve a combination of both serological and cellular mechanisms. This work is focused on the identification of the possible relevant serological immunodeterminants of immunity. Thus, 14 serological immunodeterminants of ASFV have been characterized by exhaustive screening of a representative lambda phage cDNA expression library of the tissue culture-adapted Ba71V strain of ASFV. The library was constructed using RNA extracted from Vero cells infected for 3, 6, 9 and 12 h. A total of 150 clones was selected arbitrarily by antibody screening of the library with a polyclonal antiserum from a domestic pig surviving infection with the virulent Malta isolate of ASFV. Sequencing of these clones permitted identification of 14 independent viral proteins that stimulated an antibody response. These included six proteins encoded by previously unassigned open reading frames (ORFs) (B602L, C44L, CP312R, E184L, K145R and K205R) as well as some of the more well-studied structural (A104R, p10, p32, p54 and p73) and non-structural proteins (RNA reductase, DNA ligase and thymidine kinase). Immunogenicity of these proteins was confirmed by demonstrating the corresponding antibodies in sera from pigs infected either with the Malta isolate or with the OURT88/3–OURT88/1 isolate combination. Furthermore, the majority of these ORFs were also recognized by immune antiserum from the natural host, the bush pig, following secondary challenge with the virulent Malawi (SINT90/1) isolate of ASFV. Thus, it is possible that some of these determinants may be important in protection against virus infection.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-83-6-1331
2002-06-01
2020-08-03
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/83/6/0831331a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-83-6-1331&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Albert M. L., Pearce S. F., Francisco L. M., Sauter B., Roy P., Silverstein R. L., Bhardwaj N.. 1998; Immature dendritic cells phagocytose apoptotic cells via αvβ5 and CD36, and cross-present antigens to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Journal of Experimental Medicine188:1359–1368
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Alcaráz C., Brun A., Ruíz-Gonzalvo F., Escribano J. M.. 1992; Cell culture propagation modifies the African swine fever virus replication phenotype in macrophages and generates viral subpopulations differing in protein p54. Virus Research23:173–182
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Alonso F., Dominguez J., Viñuela E., Revilla Y.. 1997; African swine fever virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize the 32 kDa immediate early protein (vp32). Virus Research49:123–130
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bellone M., Iezzi G., Rovere P., Galati G., Ronchetti A., Protti M. P., Davoust J., Rugarli C., Manfredi A. A.. 1997; Processing of engulfed apoptotic bodies yields T cell epitopes. Journal of Immunology159:5391–5399
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Borca M. V., Irusta P., Carrillo C., Afonso C. L., Burrage T., Rock D. L.. 1994; African swine fever virus structural protein p72 contains a conformational neutralizing epitope. Virology201:413–418
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Brookes S. M., Dixon L. K., Parkhouse R. M.. 1996; Assembly of African swine fever virus: quantitative ultrastructural analysis in vitro and in vivo . Virology224:84–92
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Carrascosa A. L., del Val M., Santarén J. F., Viñuela E.. 1985; Purification and properties of African swine fever virus. Journal of Virology54:337–344
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Cedillo-Barron L., Foster-Cuevas M., Belsham G. J., Lefevre F., Parkhouse R. M.. 2001; Induction of a protective response in swine vaccinated with DNA encoding foot-and-mouth disease virus empty capsid proteins and the 3D RNA polymerase. Journal of General Virology82:1713–1724
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Cistué C., Tabarés E.. 1992; Expression in vivo and in vitro of the major structural protein (VP73) of African swine fever virus. Archives of Virology123:111–124
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Coggins L.. 1968; Segregation of a nonhemadsorbing African swine fever virus in tissue culture. Cornell Veterinarian58:12–20
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Coggins L.. 1974; African swine fever. Pathogenesis. Progress in Medical Virology 18:48–63
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Costa J.. 1990; African swine fever virus. In Molecular Biology of Iridoviruses pp247–270 Edited by Darai G.. Dordrecht: Kluwer;
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Cowan K. M.. 1961; Immunological studies on African swine fever virus. Elimination of the procomplementary activity of swine serum with formalin. Journal of Immunology86:353–361
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Crowther J. R., Wardley R. C., Wilkinson P. J.. 1979; Solid-phase radioimmunoassay techniques for the detection of African swine fever antigen and antibody. Journal of Hygeine83:353–361
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Dixon L. K., Twigg S. R., Baylis S. A., Vydelingum S., Bristow C., Hammond J. M., Smith G. L.. 1994; Nucleotide sequence of a 55 kbp region from the right end of the genome of a pathogenic African swine fever virus isolate (Malawi LIL20/1). Journal of General Virology75:1655–1684
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Esteves A., Marques M. I., Costa J. V.. 1986; Two-dimensional analysis of African swine fever virus proteins and proteins induced in infected cells. Virology152:192–206
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Gomez-Puertas P., Rodriguez F., Oviedo J. M., Ramiro-Ibañez F., Ruiz-Gonzalvo F., Alonso C., Escribano J. M.. 1996; Neutralizing antibodies to different proteins of African swine fever virus inhibit both virus attachment and internalization. Journal of Virology70:5689–5694
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Gomez-Puertas P., Rodriguez F., Oviedo J. M., Brun A., Alonso C., Escribano J. M.. 1998; The African swine fever virus proteins p54 and p30 are involved in two distinct steps of virus attachment and both contribute to the antibody-mediated protective immune response. Virology243:461–471
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Haresnape J. M., Wilkinson P. J., Mellor P. S.. 1988; Isolation of African swine fever virus from ticks of the Ornithodoros moubata complex (Ixodoidea: Argasidae) collected within the African swine fever enzootic area of Malawi. Epidemiology and Infection101:173–185
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Hamdy F. M., Colgrove G. S., de Rodriguez E. M., Snyder M. L., Stewart W. C.. 1981; Field evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibody to African swine fever virus. American Journal of Veterinary Research42:1441–1443
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Hingamp P. M., Leyland M. L., Webb J., Twigger S., Mayer R. J., Dixon L. K.. 1995; Characterization of a ubiquitinated protein which is externally located in African swine fever virions. Journal of Virology69:1785–1793
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Irusta P. M., Borca M. V., Kutish G. F., Lu Z., Caler E., Carrillo C., Rock D. L.. 1996; Amino acid tandem repeats within a late viral gene define the central variable region of African swine fever virus. Virology220:20–27
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Jenson J. S., Childerstone A., Takamatsu H., Dixon L. K., Parkhouse R. M.. 2000; The cellular immune recognition of proteins expressed by an African swine fever virus random genomic library. Journal of Immunological Methods242:33–42
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Katrak K., Mahon B. P., Jones W. C., Bräutigam S., Mill K. H. G.. 1992; Preparative separation of foreign antigens for highly efficient presentation to T cells in vitro . Journal of Immunological Methods156:247–254
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Knudsen R. C., Genovesi E. V., Whyard T. C.. 1987; In vitro immune serum-mediated protection of pig monocytes against African swine fever virus. American Journal of Veterinary Research48:1067–1071
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Leitão A., Malur A., Cornelis P., Martins C. L. V.. 1998; Identification of a 25 amino acid sequence from the major African swine fever virus structural protein VP72 recognised by porcine cytotoxic T lymphocytes using a lipoprotein based expression system. Journal of Virological Methods75:113–119
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Lin Y. L., Chen L. K., Liao C. L., Yeh C. T., Ma S. H., Chen J. L., Huang Y. L., Chen S. S., Chiang H. Y.. 1998; DNA immunization with Japanese encephalitis virus nonstructural protein NS1 elicits protective immunity in mice. Journal of Virology72:191–200
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Malmquist W. A.. 1963; Serologic and immunologic studies with African swine fever virus. American Journal of Veterinary Research24:450–459
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Martins C. L., Lawman M. J., Scholl T., Mebus C. A., Lunney J. K.. 1993; African swine fever virus specific porcine cytotoxic T cell activity. Archives of Virology129:211–225
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Mebus C. A.. 1988; African swine fever. Advances in Virus Research35:251–269
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Montgomery R. E.. 1921; On a form of swine fever occurring in British East Africa (Kenya Colony). Journal of Comparative Pathology34:159–191
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Moore D. M., Zsak L., Neilan J. G., Lu Z., Rock D. L.. 1998; The African swine fever virus thymidine kinase gene is required for efficient replication in swine macrophages and for virulence in swine. Journal of Virology72:10310–10315
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Pan I. C., DeBoer C. J., Hess W. R.. 1972; African swine fever: application of immunoelectroosmophoresis for the detection of antibody. Canadian Journal of Comparative Medicine36:309–316
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Pan I. C., Trautman R., Hess W. R., DeBoer C. J., Tessler J.. 1974; African swine fever: detection of antibody by reverse single radial immunodiffusion. American Journal of Veterinary Research35:351–354
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Pan I. C., Huang T. S., Hess W. R.. 1982; New method of antibody detection by indirect immunoperoxidase plaque staining for serodiagnosis of African swine fever. Journal of Clinical Microbiology16:650–655
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Parker J., Plowright W.. 1968; Plaque formation by African swine fever virus. Nature219:524–525
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Rodriguez J. M., Salas M. L., Vinuela E.. 1996; Intermediate class of mRNAs in African swine fever virus. Journal of Virology70:8584–8589
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Ruiz-Gonzalvo F., Carnero M. E., Caballero C., Martinez J.. 1986; Inhibition of African swine fever infection in the presence of immune sera in vivo and in vitro . American Journal of Veterinary Research47:1249–1252
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Sambrook J., Fritsch E. F., Maniatis T.. (editors) 1989; Molecular cloning: a Laboratory Manual , 2nd edn. Cold Spring Harbor, NY: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Schlafer D. H., McVicar J. W., Mebus C. A.. 1984; African swine fever convalescent sows: subsequent pregnancy and the effect of colostral antibody on challenge inoculation of their pigs. American Journal of Veterinary Research45:1361–1366
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Viñuela E.. 1985; African swine fever virus. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology116:151–170
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Wardley R. C., Norley S. G., Wilkinson P. J., Williams S.. 1985; The role of antibody in protection against African swine fever virus. Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology9:201–212
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Wilkinson P. J.. 1989; African swine fever virus. In Virus Infections of Porcines pp17–37 Edited by Pensaert M. B.. Amsterdam: Elsevier;
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Yañez R. J., Rodríguez J. M., Nogal M. L., Yuste L., Enriquez C., Rodríguez J. F., Viñuela E.. 1995; Analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence of African swine fever virus. Virology208:249–278
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Zsak L., Onisk D. V., Afonso C. L., Rock D. L.. 1993; Virulent African swine fever virus isolates are neutralized by swine immune serum and by monoclonal antibodies recognizing a 72-kDa viral protein. Virology196:596–602
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-83-6-1331
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-83-6-1331
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error