1887

Abstract

The type strain of (CCMV-T) produces a bright chlorosis in cowpea ( cv. California Blackeye). The attenuated variant (CCMV-M) induces mild green mottle symptoms that were previously mapped to RNA 3. Restriction fragment exchanges between RNA 3 cDNA clones of CCMV-T and CCMV-M that generate infectious transcripts and site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the codon encoding amino acid residue 151 of the coat protein determines the symptom phenotypes of CCMV-T and CCMV-M. Amino acid 151 is within an α-helical structure required for calcium ion binding and virus particle stability. No differences in virion stability or accumulation were detected between CCMV-T and CCMV-M. Mutational analysis suggested that the amino acid at position 151 and not the nucleotide sequence induce the symptom phenotype. Thus, it is likely that subtle influences by amino acid residue 151 in coat protein–host interactions result in chlorotic and mild green mottle symptoms.

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2002-04-01
2019-10-13
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