1887

Abstract

Most studies on the molecular biology and functional analysis of vesicular stomatitis virus Indiana 1 serotype (VSV-IN1) are based on the only full-length genomic sequence currently deposited in GenBank. This sequence is a composite of several VSV-IN1 laboratory strains passaged extensively in tissue culture over the years and it is not certain that this sequence is representative of strains circulating in nature. We describe here the complete genomic sequence of three natural isolates, each representing a distinct genetic lineage and geographical origin: 98COE (North America), 94GUB (Central America) and 85CLB (South America). Genome structure and organization were conserved, with a 47 nucleotide 3′ leader, five viral genes – N, P, M, G and L – and a 59 nucleotide 5′ trailer. The most conserved gene was N, followed by M, L and G, with the most variable being P. Sequences containing the polyadenylation and transcription stop and start signals were completely conserved among all the viruses studied, but changes were found in the non-transcribed intergenic nucleotides, including the presence of a trinucleotide at the M–G junction of the South American lineage isolate. A 102–189 nucleotide insertion was present in the 5′ non-coding region of the G gene only in the viruses within a genetic lineage from northern Central America. These full-length genomic sequences should be useful in designing diagnostic probes and in the interpretation of functional genomic analyses using reverse genetics.

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2002-10-01
2019-10-23
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