1887

Abstract

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1), which binds to both the EBV origin of replication () and metaphase chromosomes, is essential for the replication/retention and segregation/partition of -containing plasmids. Here the chromosomal localization of EBNA-1 fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP–EBNA-1) is examined by confocal microscopy combined with a ‘premature chromosome condensation’ (PCC) procedure. Analyses show that GFP–EBNA-1 expressed in living cells that lack plasmids is associated with cellular chromatin that has been condensed rapidly by the PCC procedure into identifiable forms that are unique to each phase of interphase as well as metaphase chromosomes. Studies of cellular chromosomal DNAs labelled with BrdU or Cy3-dUTP indicate that GFP–EBNA-1 colocalizes highly with the labelled, newly replicated regions of interphase chromatin in cells. These results suggest that EBNA-1 is associated not only with cellular metaphase chromosomes but also with condensing chromatin/chromosomes and probably with interphase chromatin, especially with its newly replicated regions.

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2002-10-01
2019-10-19
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