1887

Abstract

Deletion of amino acids 79–88 in the duck hepatitis B virus reverse transcriptase had minimal effects on polymerase activities prior to the minus-strand DNA transfer reaction, yet it greatly diminished strand transfer and subsequent DNA synthesis. This mutation also reduced reverse transcription on exogenous RNA templates. The reaction on exogenous RNAs employed the phosphonoformic acid (PFA)-sensitive elongation mode of DNA synthesis rather than the PFA-resistant priming mode, despite the independence of DNA synthesis in this assay from the priming and minus-strand transfer reactions. These data provide experimental evidence that the polymerase is involved directly in the minus-strand transfer reaction and that the switch of the polymerase from the early PFA-resistant mode of DNA synthesis to the later PFA-sensitive elongation mode does not require the strand-transfer reaction.

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2000-08-01
2019-12-06
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