1887

Abstract

This paper describes the use of one-step growth conditions to study the kinetics of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) replication in primary duck hepatocytes. Synchronized infection was achieved using partially purified DHBV virions at an m.o.i. of 640 DHBV DNA-containing virions per cell, and these conditions were shown to produce a single cycle of infection. In this model, input purified DHBV DNA was rapidly internalized by cells at ⩾0·5 h, and localized to the nucleus by 4 h, but both covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA and single-stranded DNA were not detected until 48 h post-inoculation (p.i.), suggesting that there was a ⩾40 h delay between DHBV localization to the nucleus and formation of CCC DNA. In contrast, CCC DNA can be first detected in hepatocytes at 6 h p.i. in infection of ducks with the same DHBV strain. In an analysis of the nuclear transport of the DHBV genome, release of nuclear viral DNA from a particulate form to a soluble nucleoplasmic form was only 50% complete by 48 h p.i. However, this process occurred simultaneously with genome uncoating since all soluble nucleoplasmic DHBV DNA was free of nucleocapsid material; this suggests that nucleocapsid disassembly and genome uncoating may occur at the nuclear membrane and not within the nucleus. Quantitative analysis demonstrated inefficiency in a number of steps including virus uptake and internalization, translocation of nucleocapsid across the nuclear membrane and antigen expression from intranuclear viral DNA.

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1999-08-01
2020-01-22
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