1887

Abstract

Parvovirus B19 is the only member of the Parvoviridae family known to cause disease in humans. Owing to the high level of cell tropism the virus can only replicate in proliferating and differentiating erythroid precursor cells, which are present in human bone marrow and foetal liver. As human bone marrow is very difficult to obtain, an alternative in vitro system for the propagation of B19 virus has been developed, based on the application of mobilized haemapoietic progenitor (apheresis) cells. These cells are routinely harvested from cancer patients after treatment with recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Replication of parvovirus B19 in vitro is possible in these cells after stimulation with erythropoietin. Therefore, this system is an easily, accessible alternative to the use of human bone marrow in parvovirus B19 infection assays.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-80-3-627
1999-03-01
2024-02-29
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/80/3/0800627a.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-80-3-627&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Anderson M. J., Khousam M. N., Maxwell D. J., Gould S. J., Happerfield L. C., Smith W. J. 1988; Human parvovirus B19 and hydrops fetalis. Lancet i:535
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Anderson M. J., Jones S. E., Fisher-Hoch S.-P., Lewis E., Hall S. M., Bartlett C. L., Cohen B. J., Mortimer P. P., Pereira M. S. 1983; Human parvovirus, the cause of erythema infectiosum (fifth disease)?. Lancet i:1378
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brown K. E., Anderson S. M., Young N. S. 1993; Erythrocyte P antigen: cellular receptor for B19 parvovirus. Science 262:114–117
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Brown K. E., Young N. S., Liu J. M. 1994; Molecular, cellular and clinical aspects of parvovirus B19 infection. Critical Reviews in Oncology and Hematology 16:1–031
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Hawkins T. E., Juttner C. A. 1995; Blood cell transplantation. Current Opinion in Oncology 7:122–129
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Hénon P. R. 1993; Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: critical review. The International Journal of Artificial Organs 16:64–70
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kanz L., Brugger W., Mertelsmann R. 1995; Peripheral blood progenitor cells: mobilization, enrichment, ex vivo expansion, and clinical use. In Hematopoietic Growth Factors in Clinical Applications 2nd edn pp 227–239 Edited by Mertelsmann R., Herrmann F. New York: Marcel Dekker;
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Morgan D. A., Gumucio D. L., Brodsky I. 1991; Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent growth and erythropoietin-induced differentiation of human cell line MB-02. Blood 78:2860–2871
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Munshi N. C., Zhou S., Woody M. J., Morgan D. A., Srivastava A. 1993; Successful replication of parvovirus B19 in the human mega-karyocytic leukemia cell line MB-02. Journal of Virology 67:562–566
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Naides S. J., Scharosch L. L., Foto F., Howard E. J. 1990; Rheumatological manifestations of human parvovirus B19 infection in adults. Arthritis and Rheumatism 33:1297–1309
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Ozawa K., Kurtzman G., Young N. 1986; Replication of the B19 parvovirus in human bone marrow cell cultures. Science 233:883–886
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Pattison J. R., Jones S. E., Hodgson J., Davis L. R., White F. M., Stroud C. E., Murtaza L. 1981; Parvovirus infections and hypoplastic crisis in sickle-cell anaemia. Lancet i:664–665
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Reid D. M., Reid T. M., Brown T., Rennie J. A., Eastmond C. J. 1985; Human parvovirus-associated arthritis: a clinical and laboratory description. Lancet i:422–425
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Rouger Ph., Gane P., Salmon C. 1987; Tissue distribution of H, Lewis and P antigens as shown by a panel of 18 monoclonal antibodies. Revue Francaise de Transfusion et Immuno-hématologie 5:699–708
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Shade R. O., Blundell M. C., Cotmore S. F., Tattersall P., Astell C. R. 1986; Nucleotide sequence and genome organisation of human parvovirus B19 isolated from the serum of a child during aplastic crisis. Journal of Virology 58:921–936
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Shimomura S., Wong S., Brown K. E., Komatsu N., Kajigaya S., Young N. S. 1993; Early and late gene expression in UT-7 cells infected with B19 parvovirus. Virology 194:149–156
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Takahashi T., Ozawa K., Takahashi K., Asano S., Takaku F. 1990; Susceptibility of human erythropoeitic cells to B19 parvovirus in vitro increases with differentiation. Blood 75:603–610
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Takahashi T., Ozawa K., Takahashi K., Okuno Y., Takahashi T., Muto Y., Takaku F., Asano S. 1993; DNA replication of parvovirus B19 in a human erythroid leukemia cell line (JK-1) in vitro. Archives of Virology 131:201–208
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Yaegashi N., Shiraishi H., Takeshita T., Nakamura M., Yajima A., Sugamura K. 1989; Propagation of human parvovirus B19 in primary culture of erythroid lineage cells derived from fetal liver. Journal of Virology 63:2422–2426
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Young N. S., Ozawa K. 1988; Studies of B19 virus in bone marrow cell culture. In Parvoviruses and Human Disease pp 117–132 Edited by Pattison J. R. Boca Raton: CRC Press;
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-80-3-627
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-80-3-627
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error