1887

Abstract

Tubular structures containing bacilliform virions were observed in cell-free extracts of infected with yellow mottle badnavirus (CoYMV). The exterior of the tubule reacted with antibodies to CoYMV movement protein, but not with antibodies to virus coat protein. Similar tubular structures containing bacilliform particles were also observed in ultrathin sections of CoYMV- infected These tubular structures traversed the cell wall at points where this was thickened or protruded. No similar structures were observed in healthy . These observations support the hypothesis that the virion-containing tubular structures observed in cell-free extracts are the same as those observed that these structures are composed, at least in part, of virus movement protein, and that they play a role in the cell-to-cell trafficking of virions of CoYMV.

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1998-04-01
2022-05-23
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