1887

Abstract

Germ cell tumours (GCT) of the testis are the most common malignant tumours occurring in young adults. In view of the young age of patients, the increasing incidence of GCT and the overexpression of wild-type p53 observed in a majority of tumours, the possibility of the involvement of a virus in the development of this cancer was considered. Testicular GCT were analysed for the presence of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which are known to cause overexpression of wild- type p53 protein, and parvovirus B19. The testicular tissue of 39 patients with testicular GCT and 12 patients with healthy testicular tissues was tested for presence of viral DNA by PCR. Neither cytomegalovirus nor EBV DNAs were detected in the 39 tumours analysed, but parvovirus B19 DNA sequences were demonstrated in the testicular tissue of 85% (33/39 cases) of patients with GCT. The sera of 16 of the 39 patients with GCT were tested for the presence of parvovirus B19 IgM and IgG. B19-specific IgG was detected in the sera of 11 patients (69%). Only one case was positive for parvovirus B19 IgM, which was also shown to have B19 genome sequences in the serum by PCR, indicating that in a majority of cases an acute B19 infection can be excluded as being the source of the B19 DNA sequences in the testis. B19 DNA could not be detected in normal testicular tissue and thus parvovirus B19 could play a role, direct or indirect, in the development of testicular GCT or have tropism for the tumour cells.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-79-3-573
1998-03-01
2021-10-27
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/79/3/9519836.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-79-3-573&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Algood C. B., Newell G. R., Johnson D. E. 1988; Viral etiology of testicular tumors. Journal of Urology 139:308–310
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Allday M. J., Sinclair A., Parker G., Crawford D. H., Farrell P. J. 1995; Epstein-Bar virus effiently immortalizes human B cells without neutralizing the function of p53. EMBO journal 14:1382–1391
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Anand A., Gray E. S., Brown T., Clewley J. P., Cohen B. J. 1987; Human parvovirus infection in pregnancy and hydrops fetalis. New England Journal of Medicine 316:183–186
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Anderson M. J., Jones S. E., Fisher-Hoch S. P., Lewis E., Hall S. M., Bartlett C. L. R., Cohen B. J., Mortimer P. P., Pereira M. S. 1983; Human parvovirus, the cause of erythema infectiosum (fifth disease)?. Lancet i 1378
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Anderson M. J., Higgins P. J., Davis L. R., Willman J. S., Jones S. E., Kidd I. M., Pattison J. R., Tyrrell D. A. J. 1985; Experimental parvoviral infection in humans. Journal of Infectious Diseases 58:257–265
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Antonietti J. P., Sahli R., Beard P., Hirt B. 1988; Characterization of the cell type-specific determinant in the genome of minute virus of mice. Journal of Virology 62:552–557
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Ball-Goodrich L. J., Tattersall P. 1992; Two amino acid substitutions within the capsid are coordinately required for acquisition of fibrotropism by the lymphotropic strain of minute virus of mice. Journal of Virology 66:3415–3423
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Blundell M. C., Beard C., Astell C. R. 1987; In vitro identification of a B19 parvovirus promoter. Virology 157:534–538
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Boldogh I., Baskar J. F., Mar E. -C., Huang E. -S. 1983; Human cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex type 2 virus in normal and adenocarcinomatous prostate glands. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 70:819–825
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Brown K. E., Young N. S. 1996; Parvoviruses and bone marrow failure. Stem Cells 14:151–163
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Carrière C., Boulanger P., Delsert C. 1993; Rapid and sensitive method for the detection of B19 virus DNA using the polymerase chain reaction with nested primers. Journal of Virological Methods 44:221–234
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Cassinotti P., Weitz M., Siegl G. 1993; Human parvovirus B19 infections: routine diagnosis by a new nested polymerase chain reaction assay. Journal of Medical Virology 40:228–234
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Chaubert P., Bautista D., Benhatter J. 1993; An improved method for rapid screening of DNA mutations by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism procedure. BioTechniques 15:586
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Cossart Y. E., Field A. M., Cant B., Windows D. 1975; Parvovirus-like particles in human sera. Lancet i:72–73
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Durigon E. L., Erdman D. D., Gary G. W., Pallansch M. A., Torok T. J., Anderson L. J. 1993; Multiple primer pairs for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification ofhuman parvovirus B19 DNA. Journal of Virological Methods 44:155–165
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Fend F, Hittmair A., Rogatsch H., Gredler E., Obrist P., Mikuz G. 1993; Seminomas positive for Epstein-Barr virus by the polymerase chain reaction : viral RNA transcripts (Epstein-Barr-encoded small RNAs) are present in intratumoral lymphocytes but absent from the neoplastic cells. Modern Pathology 8:622–625
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Finch C. M. 1995; Human parvovirus B19 in pregnancy. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic & Neonatal Nursing 24:495–498
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Forman D., Moller H. 1994; Testicular cancer. Cancer Surveys 19/ 20:323–341
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Gallinella G., Venturoli S., Gentilomi G., Musiani M., Zerbini M. 1995; Extent of sequence variability in a genomic region coding for capsid proteins of B19 parvovirus. Archives of Virology 140:1119–1125
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Guillou L., Estreicher A., Chaubert P., Hurlimann J., Kurt A. M., Metthez G., Iggo R., Gray A. C., Jichlinski P., Benhattar J. 1996; Germ cell tumors of the testis overexpress wild-type p53. American Journal of Pathology 149:1221–1228
    [Google Scholar]
  21. zurHausen H. 1986; Intracellular surveillance of persisting viral infections. Lancet ii:489–491
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Heinzer H., Dieckmann K. P., Huland E. 1993; Virus-related serology and in situ hybridization for the detection of virus DNA among patients with testicular cancer. European Urology 24:271–276
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Hemauer A., VonPoblotzki A., Gigler A., Cassinotti P., Siegl G., Wolf H., Modrow S. 1996; Sequence variability among different parvovirus B19 isolates. Journal of General Virology 77:1781–1785
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Henderson B. E. 1989; Establishment of an association between avirus and a human cancer. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 81:320–321
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Jault F. M., Jault J. M., Ruchti F., Fortunato E. A., Clark C., Corbeil J., Richman D. D., Spector D. H. 1995; Cytomegalovirus infection induces high levels of cyclins, phosphorylated Rb, and p53, leading to cell cycle arrest. Journal of Virology 69:6697–6704
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Kerr J. R., Curran M. D., Moore J. E., Erdman D. D., Coyle P. V., Nunoue T., Middleton D., Ferguson W. P. 1995; Genetic diversity in the non-structural gene of parvovirus B19 detected by single-stranded conformational polymorphism assay (SSCP) and partial nucleotide sequencing. Journal of Virological Methods 53:213–222
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Koffa M., Koumantakis E., Ergazaki M., Tsatsanis C., Spandidos D. A. 1995; Association of herpesvirus infection with the development of genital cancer. International Journal of Cancer 63:58–62
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Kurtzman G. J., Ozawa K., Cohen B., Hanson G., Oseas R., Young N. S. 1987; Chronic bone marrow failure due to persistent B19 parvovirus infection. New England Journal of Medicine 317:287–294
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Kurtzman G. J., Cohen B., Meyers P., Amunullah A., Young N. S. 1988; Persistent B19 parvovirus infection as a cause of severe chronic anaemia in children with acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Lancet ii 1159–1162
    [Google Scholar]
  30. McOmish F., Yap P. L., Jordan A., Hart H., Cohen B. J., Simmonds P. 1993; Detection of parvovirus B19 in donated blood: a model system for screening by polymerase chain reaction. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 31:323–328
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Masucci M. G. 1993; Viral immunopathology of human tumors. Current Opinion in Immunology 5:693–700
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Mori J., Beattie P., Melton D. W., Cohen B. J., Clewley J. P. 1987; .Structure and mapping of the DNA of human parvovirus B19. Journal of General Virology 68:2797–2806
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Mueller N., Hinkula J., Wahren B. 1988; Elevated antibody titers against cytomegalovirus among patients with testicular cancer. International Journal of Cancer 41:399–403
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Muganda P., Mendoza O., Hernandez J., Qian Q. 1994; Human cytomegalovirus elevates levels of the cellular protein p53 in infected fibroblasts. Journal of Virology 68:8028–8034
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Newell G. R., Mills P. K., Johnson D. E. 1984; Epidemiologic comparison of cancer of the testis and Hodgkin’s disease among young males. Cancer 54:1117–1123
    [Google Scholar]
  36. OpDeBeck A., Anouja F., Mousset S., Rommelaere J., Caillet-Fauquet P. 1995; The nonstructural proteins of the autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice interfere with the cell cycle, inducing accumulation in G2. Cell Growth & Differentiation 6:781–787
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Pattison J. R. 1990; Parvovirus: medical and biological aspects. In Virology,, 2nd edn.. pp 1765–1784 Fields B., Knipe D. Edited by New York: Raven Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  38. Rajpert-DeMeyts E., Hording U., Nielsen H. W., Skakkebaek N. E. 1994; Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours. APMIS 102:38–42
    [Google Scholar]
  39. Saal J. G., Steidle M., Einsele H., Muller C. A., Fritz P., Zacher J. 1992; Persistence of B19 parvovirus in synovial membranes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatology International 12:147–151
    [Google Scholar]
  40. Sambrook J., Fritsch E. F., Maniatis T. 1989; . Molecular Cloning: a Laboratory Manual,, 2nd edn.. Cold Spring Harbor, NY:: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory.;
    [Google Scholar]
  41. Shade R. O., Blundell M. C., Cotmore S. F., Tattersall P., Astell C. R. 1986; Nucleotide sequence and genome organisation of human parvovirus B19 isolated from the serum of a child during aplastic crisis. Journal of Virology 58:921–936
    [Google Scholar]
  42. Taylor H. G., Borg A. A., Dawes P. T. 1992; Human parvovirus B19 and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical Rheumatology 11:548–550
    [Google Scholar]
  43. Telerman A., Tuynder M., Dupressoir T., Robaye B., Sigaux F., Shaulian E., Oren M., Rommelaere J., Amson R. 1993; A model for tumor suppression using H-1 parvovirus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 90:8702–8706
    [Google Scholar]
  44. Tsuda H. 1993; Liver dysfunction caused by parvovirus B19. American Journal of Gastroenterology 80:1463
    [Google Scholar]
  45. Umene K., Nunoue T. 1995; A new genome type of human parvovirus B19 present in sera of patients with encephalopathy. Journal of General Virology 76:2645–2651
    [Google Scholar]
  46. Weiland H. T., Salimans M. M., Fibbe W. E., Kluin P. M., Cohen B. J. 1989; Prolonged parvovirus B19 infection with severe anaemia in a bone marrow transplant patient. British Journal ofHaematology 71:300
    [Google Scholar]
  47. Wright C., Hinchliffe S. A., Taylor C. 1996; Fetal pathology in intrauterine death due to parvovirus B19 infection. British Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 103:133–136
    [Google Scholar]
  48. Young L. S., Rowe M. 1992; Epstein-Barr virus, lymphomas and Hodgkin’s disease. Seminars in Cancer Biology 3:273–284
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-79-3-573
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-79-3-573
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error