1887

Abstract

We have previously demonstrated that two distinct transcripts are produced from ORF 50, the major transcriptional activating gene of herpesvirus saimiri. The products of these transcripts trans- activate the delayed-early ORF 6 promoter, though to different degrees. Deletion analysis demonstrated that the ORF 50 responsive elements are contained in a 132 bp fragment situated 127–259 bp from the transcription initiation site within the ORF 6 promoter. This fragment conferred ORF 50-responsiveness on an enhancerless simian virus 40. Gel retardation analysis further mapped the responsive elements to a 38 bp fragment.

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1997-06-01
2022-05-26
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