1887

Abstract

NSP5 (non-structural protein 5) is one of two proteins encoded by genome segment 11 of group A rotaviruses. In virus-infected cells NSP5 accumulates in the virosomes and is found as two polypeptides with molecular masses of 26 and 28 kDa (26K and 28K proteins). NSP5 has been previously shown to be post-translationally modified by the addition of -linked monosaccharide residues of -acetylglucosamine and also by phosphorylation. We have now found that, as a consequence of phosphorylation, a complex modification process gives rise to previously unidentified forms of NSP5, with molecular masses of up to 34 kDa. Treatment with phosphatases of NSP5 obtained from virus-infected cells produced a single band of 26 kDa. NSP5 could be phosphorylated by incubation of immuno-precipitates with [γ-P]ATP, producing mainly phosphorylated products of 28 and 32–34 kDa (32–34K). In both and phosphorylated NSP5, phosphates were only found attached via serine and threonine residues. The translated NSP5 precursor polypeptide, molecular mass 25 kDa (25K), could also be phosphorylated and transformed into a 28K protein by incubation with extracts obtained from virus-infected cells, but not from non-infected cells. In addition, NSP5 labelled with [1,6-H]glucosamine showed mainly the presence of the 26K and 28K proteins (converted to 26K by protein phosphatase treatment) suggesting that the type of protein produced is regulated according to the level of phosphorylation and/or -glycosylation. The results also suggest that NSP5 is autophosphorylated.

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1996-09-01
2021-10-17
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