1887

Abstract

The published sequence of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 strain HG52 neurovirulence gene RL1 indicated that, unlike the HSV-1 homologue, the gene contains a 154 bp intron. This intron contains six complete and one partial copy of a 19 bp repeat which encodes a stop codon; thus all three forward frames are blocked. By RT-PCR of poly(A) RNA, using primers on either side of the proposed intron, we have isolated a partial cDNA clone corresponding to the predicted spliced mRNA.

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1996-03-01
2022-09-29
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