1887

Abstract

The RNA genome of hepatitis A virus (HAV) encodes a giant polyprotein that is putatively cleaved proteolytically into four structural and seven non-structural proteins. So far, most of the proposed non-structural proteins and their respective cleavage sites have not been identified. A vaccinia virus recombinant (vRGORF) containing the complete HAV ORF under the control of the bacteriophage T7 promoter was used to express HAV in recombinant animal cells (BT7-H) that constitutively expressed T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase. A HAV-specific 27.5 kDa expression product was identified as peptide 2B. The 27.5 kDa 2B antigen was also found in HAV-infected MRC-5 cells. The N-terminal amino acid residues of the new peptide 2B are Ala-Lys-Ile-Ser-Leu-Phe and polyprotein cleavage between 2A and 2B occurred at amino acids 836–837 (Gln-Ala). Furthermore, heterologous expression in the same system of regions P1–P2 and of the protease 3C (3C) gene, showed that P1–P2 polyprotein is not cleaved autocatalytically but by 3C. Hence, 3C is effective in cleaving the polyprotein 2A–2B junction.

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1996-02-01
2022-05-23
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