1887

Abstract

The viral latent membrane proteins 2 (LMP2) of Epstein—Barr virus (EBV) were analysed genetically to evaluate their role in B cell immortalization. LMP2 is transcribed as two differently spliced mRNAs which code for the LMP2A and -B proteins, also called terminal protein-1 and -2. LMP2A and -B are found in latently infected, growth-transformed B lymphocytes in different human tumours, and in latently infected B cells . Two different approaches were used to generate EBV mutants in which the second, third and part of the fourth exon of the LMP2 gene were deleted by insertion of a marker gene. Initially, conventional homologous recombination in a Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line (P3HR1) between the endogenous EBV genome and an introduced plasmid was used to generate EBV mutants. This experiment identified LMP2 as dispensable for B cell immortalization as has been reported. In a second approach, the same LMP2 mutant gene was analysed in the context of a mini-EBV plasmid. These are constructs that are sufficient when packaged into an EBV coat both to initiate and to maintain proliferation of infected B cells. In comparison with a fully competent mini-EBV, LMP2 mini-EBVs were found to be greatly reduced in their capacity to yield immortalized B cell clones. This finding confirmed the initially observed bias against LMP2 B cell clones, most of which were found to be coinfected with complementing P3HR1 virus. These results indicate that LMP2 contributes to the efficiency of B cell immortalization and that the LMP2s phenotype is auxiliary in nature.

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1996-11-01
2022-01-20
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