1887

Abstract

The coat protein (CP) gene-containing circular DNA molecule of an isolate of tomato leaf curl geminivirus (ITmLCV; 2749 nt) obtained from southern India, and the CP genes of tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus isolates from Nigeria and two regions of Saudi Arabia were sequenced. ITmLCV DNA had the same arrangement of ORFs, and the same pattern of repeats in the large intergenic region as is found in DNA-A of other whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses (WTGs) from the Old World. However, the sequence of ITmLCV DNA and the sequences of its predicted translation products differed substantially from those of other WTGs, including one isolate obtained from a tomato plant in northern India. Comparison of the four CP sequences deduced here with those of 18 WTGs previously studied indicated that their relationships can be represented by a tree with three branches that are unrelated to plant host species but which contain viruses from the Americas, Africa to the Middle East, and Asia to Australia, respectively. It is suggested that WTG CP evolution has proceeded along different paths in these three main regions, and that WTGs have adapted freely to new hosts in each region. Indeed, the virus isolates causing similar diseases of tomato plants in the different continents are, with few exceptions, not closely related and warrant recognition as separate species.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-76-8-2043
1995-08-01
2022-05-27
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/76/8/JV0760082043.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-76-8-2043&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Abouzid A. M., Polston J. E., Hiebert E. 1992; The nucleotide sequence of tomato mottle virus, a new geminivirus isolated from tomatoes in Florida. Journal of General Virology 73:3225–3229
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Arguello-Astorga G., Herrera-Estrella L., Rivera-Bustamante R. 1994; Experimental and theoretical definition of geminivirus origin of replication. Plant Molecular Biology 26:553–556
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Briddon R. W., Pinner M. S., Stanley J., Markham P. G. 1990; Geminivirus coat protein gene replacement alters insect specificity. Virology 177:B5–94
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cohen S., Harpaz I. 1964; Periodic, rather than continual acquisition of a new tomato virus by its vector, the tobacco whitefly (Bemisia tabaci Gennadius). Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 7:155–166
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Costa H. S., Brown J. K. 1991; Variation in biological characteristics and esterase patterns among populations of Bemisia tabaci, and the association of one population with silverleaf symptom induction. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 61:211–219
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Cotmore S. F., Tattersall P. 1987; The autonomously replicating parvoviruses of vertebrates. Advances in Virus Research 33:91–174
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Coutts R. H. A., Coffin R. S., Roberts E. J. F., Hamilton W. D. O. 1991; The nucleotide sequence of the infectious cloned DNA components of potato yellow mosaic virus. Journal of General Virology 72:1515–1520
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Devereux J., Haeberli P., Smithies O. 1984; A comprehensive set of sequence analysis programs for the VAX. Nucleic Acids Research 12:387–395
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Dry I. B., Ridgen J. E., Krake L. R., Mullineaux P. M., Rezaian M. A. 1993; Nucleotide sequence and genome organization of tomato leaf curl geminivirus. Journal of General Virology 74:147–151
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Frischmuth T., Zimmat G., Jeske H. 1990; The nucleotide sequence of abutilon mosaic virus reveals prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic features. Virology 178:461–167
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Gottschalck E., Alexandersen S., Cohn A., Poulsen L. A., Bloom Μ. E., Aasted B. 1991; Nucleotide sequence analysis of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus shows that multiple types are present in infected mink. Journal of Virology 65:4378–4386
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Hamilton W. D. O., Stein V. E., Coutts R. H. A., Buck K. W. 1984; Complete nucleotide sequence of the infectious cloned DNA components of tomato golden mosaic virus: potential coding regions and regulatory sequences. EMBO Journal 3:2197–2205
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Harrison B. D., Swanson Μ. M., McGrath P. F., Fargette D. 1991; Patterns of antigenic variation in whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses. Report of the Scottish Crop Research Institute for 199088–90
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Hidayat S. H., Gilbertson R. L., Hanson S. F., Morales F. J., Ahlquist P., Russell D. R., Maxwell D. P. 1993; Complete nucleotide sequences of the infectious cloned DNAs of bean dwarf mosaic geminivirus. Phytopathology 83:181–187
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Hong Y. G., Robinson D. J., Harrison B. D. 1993; Nucleotide sequence evidence for the occurrence of three distinct whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses in cassava. Journal of General Virology 74:2437–2443
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Howarth A. J., Caton J., Bossert M., Goodman R. M. 1985; Nucleotide sequence of bean golden mosaic virus and a model for gene regulation in geminiviruses. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 82:3572–3576
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Kheyr-Pour A., Bendahmane Μ., Matzeit V., Accotto J. P., Crespi S., Gronenborn B. 1992; Tomato yellow leaf curl virus from Sardinia is a whitefly-transmitted monopartite geminivirus. Nucleic Acids Research 19:6763–6769
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Lazarowitz S. G., Lazdins I. B. 1991; Infectivity and complete nucleotide sequence of the cloned genomic components of a bipartite squash leaf curl geminivirus with a broad host range phenotype. Virology 180:58–69
    [Google Scholar]
  19. McGrath P. F., Harrison B. D. 1995; Transmission of tomato leaf curl geminiviruses by Bemisia tabaci: effects of virus isolate and vector biotype. Annals of Applied Biology126 (in press)
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Macintosh S., Robinson D. J., Harrison B. D. 1992; Detection of three whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses occurring in Europe by tests with heterologous monoclonal antibodies. Annals of Applied Biology 121:297–303
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Makkouk K. M., Laterrot H. 1983; Epidemiology and control of tomato yellow leaf curl virus. In Plant Virus Epidemiology pp 315–321 Edited by Plumb R. T., Thresh J. M. Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications;
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Morris B., Coates L., Lowe S., Richardson K., Eddy P. 1990; Nucleotide sequence of the infectious cloned DNA components of African cassava mosaic virus (Nigerian strain). Nucleic Acids Research 18:197–198
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Muniyappa V., Swanson Μ. M., Duncan G. H., Harrison B. D. 1991; Particle purification, properties and epitope variability of Indian tomato leaf curl geminivirus. Annals of Applied Biology 118:595–604
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Navot N., Pichersky E., Zeidan M., Zamir D., Czosnek H. 1991; Tomato yellow leaf curl virus: a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus with a single genomic molecule. Virology 185:151–161
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Padidam M., Beachy R. N., Fauquet C. Μ. 1995a; Tomato leaf curl geminivirus from India has a bipartite genome and coat protein is not essential for infectivity. Journal of General Virology 16:25–35
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Padidam M., Beachy R. N., Fauquet C. M. 1995b; Classification and identification of geminiviruses using sequence comparisons. Journal of General Virology 76:249–263
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Reanney D. 1984; The molecular evolution of viruses. In The Microbe 1984 pp 175–196 Edited by Mahy B. W. J., Pattison J. R. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Rochester D. E., DePaulo J. J., Fauquet C. M., Beachy R. N. 1994; Complete nucleotide sequence of the geminivirus tomato yellow leaf curl virus, Thailand isolate. Journal of General Virology 75:477–485
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Saikia A. K., Muniyappa V. 1989; Epidemiology and control of tomato leaf curl virus in southern India. Tropical Agriculture (Trinidad) 66:350–354
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Sanger F., Nicklen S., Coulson A. R. 1977; DNA sequencing with chain-terminating inhibitors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 74:5463–5467
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Stanley J. 1995; Analysis of African cassava mosaic virus recombinants suggests strand nicking occurs within the conserved nonanucleotide motif during the initiation of rolling circle DNA replication. Virology 206:707–712
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Stanley J., Gay M. R. 1983; Nucleotide sequence of cassava latent virus DNA. Nature 301:260–262
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Swanson Μ. M., Brown J. K., Poulos B. T., Harrison B. D. 1992; Genome affinities and epitope profiles of whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses from the Americas. Annals of Applied Biology 121:285–296
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-76-8-2043
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-76-8-2043
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error