1887

Abstract

Sialoglycoproteins that are resistant to degradation by viral neuraminidase can effectively neutralize influenza A viruses, because they bind irreversibly to the viruses. To detect such proteins in animal sera, we developed an immunochemical assay based on Western blotting techniques. We assessed the binding activity of sialoglycoproteins in sera from nine different animals toward the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) and A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) strains of influenza virus, with or without viral and bacterial neuraminidase treatment. Using this assay, we found that animal sera contain a spectrum of sialoglycoproteins defined by differing abilities to bind influenza A viruses and to resist the viral neuraminidase. Structural analysis of these inhibitors would provide useful information for the development of anti-influenza virus compounds.

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1994-07-01
2021-10-22
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