1887

Abstract

A newly described whitefly-transmitted geminivirus infecting tomato plants in Florida induces yellow mottling symptoms on leaves, and stunted and distorted growth. The DNA-A and DNA-B components were cloned from extracts of field-infected tomato tissue; excised monomers or uncut tandem dimers of these clones were infectious when co-inoculated on to by rub-inoculation. Tomato plants inoculated directly with the DNA-A and DNA-B dimers, or indirectly by sap or graft transmission from plants previously infected with the dimers, developed symptoms similar to those observed in field-infected plants. This tomato geminivirus is different from previously characterized geminiviruses, and has been named tomato mottle geminivirus (ToMoV). DNA sequence comparisons revealed that ToMoV is closely related to bean dwarf mosaic geminivirus (BDMV) and abutilon mosaic geminivirus. Infectious pseudorecombinants were made by exchanging the cloned infectious DNA components of ToMoV and BDMV and inoculating plants. The presence of the inoculated DNA components in systemically infected plants was confirmed by characterization of DNA-A and DNA-B fragments amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. This is the first report of pseudorecombination between two distinct geminiviruses. The implications of this finding in geminivirus evolution are discussed.

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1993-01-01
2021-10-26
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