1887

Abstract

Subgenomic messenger RNAs transcribed from the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) S RNA segment were partially purified from total RNA extracts of TSWV-infected and analysed by primer extension analysis. The data obtained show the presence of non-viral sequences, 12 to 20 nucleotides in length, at the 5′ ends of the N and NS mRNAs, indicating a cap-snatching mechanism for the initiation of transcription. This is the first report of a plant virus using such a mechanism for transcription of the viral genome.

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1992-08-01
2022-08-15
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