1887

Abstract

Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) gene UL11 encodes a myristylated virion protein. In this paper we have characterized the UL11 product further and investigated its role in the virus life cycle. Wild-type HSV-1 strain 17syn expresses three electrophoretically distinguishable UL11 polypeptide species. Analysis of single plaque isolates demonstrated that two virus populations exist within the 17syn stock: a major population encoding only the two higher species, and a minor population encoding the lowest species alone. DNA sequence analysis suggests that the latter polypeptide differs from the former ones at a single amino acid residue only. The UL11 polypeptides are synthesized as delayed early gene products and are phosphorylated . Following subcellular fractionation of infected cells, they are found predominantly associated with membranes. Within the virus particle, they appear to reside within the tegument. An insertion mutant containing the Z gene from within the UL11 open reading frame is viable in tissue culture, although it gives smaller plaques and is impaired for growth compared to the wild-type parent or revertant viruses; it does not have a temperature-sensitive or host-range phenotype. Thus, although required for efficient replication, the myristylated HSV-1 virion protein, in contrast to those of many other viruses, is not essential for virus growth in tissue culture.

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1992-03-01
2022-01-24
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