1887

Abstract

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) exists in the human population in two genetic forms, usually referred to as type A and type B. Although many earlier studies had indicated that the A type was generally predominant, there were suggestions that the B type may exhibit a preferential tropism for nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. This study examines the prevalence of the two forms of EBV DNA present in nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsies obtained from the high incidence area of Southern China. The results obtained by Southern blot or polymerase chain reaction analyses show that in this patient group the A type of EBV is predominant.

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1992-02-01
2022-12-08
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