1887

Abstract

A new isolate of hepatitis A virus (HAV), CY-145, was isolated from stool specimens obtained from cynomologus macaques naturally infected with this agent. Sequence analysis of the capsid region of the genome indicated that this virus differed from other sequenced HAV strains by about 20% at the nucleotide level and 7% at the amino acid level. Two amino acid residues (residues 70 of VP3 and 102 of VP1), previously identified as constituting an immunodominant site and conserved in all sequenced HAVs, were changed in the CY-145 virus. Sequence analysis of a second cynomolgus HAV isolate (CY-55), which came from a different geographical location, showed the same amino acid replacement at these two sites. In addition both isolates had an amino acid substitution at the VP3-VP1 cleavage site. These data suggest that the cynomolgus HAV differs genetically and antigenically from all other sequenced HAVs.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-7-1685
1991-07-01
2022-08-13
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/72/7/JV0720071685.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-7-1685&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Andjaparidze A. G., Poleshchuk V. F., Zamyatina N. A., Savinov A. P., Gavrilovskaya I. N., Balayan M. S. 1985; Spontaneous hepatitis in Macacus fascicularis treated with immuno-suppressing drugs. Voprosy Virusologii 4:468–474
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Brown E. A., Jansen R. W., Lemon S. M. 1989; Characterization of a simian hepatitis A virus (HAV): antigenic and genetic comparison with human HAV. Journal of Virology 63:4932–4937
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Burke D. S., Heisey G. B. 1984; Wild Malaysian cynomolgus monkeys are exposed to hepatitis A virus. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 33:940–944
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Cohen J. I., Rosenblum B., Ticehurst J. R., Daemer R. J., Feinstone S. M., Purcell R. H. 1987; Complete nucleotide sequence of an attenuated hepatitis A virus: comparison with wild-type virus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A. 84:2497–2501
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Dawson J. G., Decker R. H., Norton D. K., Bryce W. H., Whittington R. O., Tribby I. I., Mushahwar I. K. 1984; Monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis A virus. Journal of Medical Virology 14:1–8
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Devereux J., Haeberli P., Smithies O. 1983; A comprehensive set of sequence analysis programs for the VAX. Nucleic Acids Research 12:387–395
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Dienstag J. L., Feinstone S. M., Purcell R. H., Hoofnagle J. H., Barker L. F., London W. T., Popper H., Peterson J. M., Kapikian A. Z. 1975; Experimental infection of chimpanzees with hepatitis A virus. Journal of Infectious Diseases 132:532–545
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Jansen R. W., Siegl G., Lemon S. M. 1990; Molecular epidemiology of human hepatitis A virus defined by an antigen-capture polymerase chain reaction method. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A 87:2867–2871
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Karetnyi Y. V., Andjaparidze A. G., Orlova T. M., Balayan M. S. 1989; Study of hepatitis A virus isolates of human and simian origin by enzyme immunoassay using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Voprosy Virusologii 8:50–53
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Linemeyer D. L., Menke J. G., Martin-Gallardo A., Hughes J. V., Young A., Mitra S. W. 1985; Molecular cloning and partial sequencing of hepatitis A viral cDNA. Journal of Virology 54:247–255
    [Google Scholar]
  11. MacGregor A., Kornitschuk M., Hurrell J. G. R., Lehmann N. I., Coulepis A. G., Locarnini S. A., Gust I. D. 1983; Monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis A virus. Journal of Clinical Microbiology 18:1237–1243
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Margolis H. S., Nainan O. V. 1990; Identification of virus components in circulating immune complexes isolated during hepatitis A infection. Hepatology 11:31–37
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Ping L. H., Jansen R. W., Stapleton J. T., Cohen J. I., Lemon S. M. 1988; Identification of an immunodominant antigenic site involving the capsid protein VP3 of hepatitis A virus. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A. 85:8281–8285
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Rico Hesse R., Pallansch M. A., Nottay B. K., Kew O. M. 1987; Geographic distribution of wild poliovirus type 1 genotypes. Virology 160:311–322
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Robertson B. H., Brown V. K., Stramer S. L., Hine T. K., Khanna B., Anderson L. J., Fields H. A., Bradley D. W., Margolis H. S. 1988; Variation within hepatitis A VP1 amino acid and nucleotide sequences. In Viral Hepatitis and Liver Disease pp. 48–54 Edited by Zuckerman A. J. New York: Alan R. Liss;
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Robertson B. H., Khanna B., Nainan O. V., Margolis H. M. 1991; Epidemiologic patterns of wild type hepatitis A virus determined by genetic variation. Journal of Infectious Diseases 163:286–292
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sambrook J., Fritsch E. F., Maniatis T. 1989 Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd. edn New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Sanger F., Nicklen S., Coulson A. R. 1977; DNA sequencing with chain-terminating inhibitors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S.A 74:5463–5467
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Strohmaier K., Wittmann-Leibold B., Geissler A. 1978; The N-terminal sequence of three coat proteins of foot-and-mouth disease virus. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 85:1640–1645
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Winship P. 1989; An improved method for directly sequencing PCR amplified material using dimethyl sulphoxide. Nucleic Acids Research 17:1266
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-7-1685
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-7-1685
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error