1887

Abstract

Glycoprotein C (gC) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a receptor for the complement component C3B. We have previously isolated HSV-1 gC strains (TN1, TN2 and TN3) from a patient with recurrent keratitis at three different times. These are very rare isolates because gC was thought to be essential for the virus . To determine whether gC modifies the interaction of complement with cell-free virus or virus-infected cells, we constructed gC recombinant viruses in which the intact gC gene of strain KOS was inserted into the TN1 virus genome. TN1 virus was inactivated by complement and TN1 virus-infected cells were lysed by complement; however, gC recombinant viruses became resistant to these effects of complement. These results suggest a role for gC in protection of both the virion envelope and the infected cell surface against damage by complement. TN1 virus was inactivated by complement from rats (Wistar, WKA, F344 and SD), guinea-pigs (Hartley) and humans, but not by complement from mice (C3H, DDD and BALB/c), which indicates that mice seem to be inappropriate as an experimental model for the study of HSV infection in which complement factors need to be considered.

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1991-04-01
2021-10-28
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