1887

Abstract

Comparisons have been made between the p10 and polyhedrin mRNA levels recovered from cells infected with nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcNPV). In molar terms and from 18 h post-infection (p.i.), the polyhedrin mRNA species increased to levels one and a half times to twice as high as the p10 levels. The influence of the polyhedrin leader sequence on the expression of a foreign gene under the control of the polyhedrin promoter was investigated using a series of four recombinant baculoviruses expressing the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus nucleocapsid (N) protein gene. The different recombinants varied in the length and composition of the upstream polyhedrin mRNA leader sequence. The recombinant containing the full-length polyhedrin leader sequence gave levels of N mRNA comparable to those of AcNPV polyhedrin mRNA. These levels were either equal to (12 h p.i.) or higher (18 to 42 h p.i.) than the p10 levels at corresponding times. Three other recombinants, with different lengths of leader sequence, accumulated significantly lower quantities of N mRNA in comparison to the p10 mRNA levels. However the mRNA levels for the three recombinants were similar (20 to 50% of the p10 level) and did not correspond to their N protein expression levels. By comparing the mRNA and protein levels, it is concluded that the sequence between -8 to +1 of the AcNPV polyhedrin translation-initiating ATG has an important function for mRNA transcription (or accumulation), while the sequences between -32 to -8 affect the overall translation efficiencies.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-10-2551
1991-10-01
2021-10-18
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/72/10/JV0720102551.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-10-2551&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Adang M. J., Miller L. K. 1982; Molecular cloning of DNA complementary to RNA of the baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus; isolation and gene products of RNA transcripts found late in infection. Journal of Virology 44:782–793
    [Google Scholar]
  2. hooft van iddekinge B. J. L., smith G. E., summers M. D. 1983; Nucleotide sequence of the polyhedrin gene of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Virology 131:561–565
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Kuzio J., Rohel D. Z., Curry C. J., Krebs A., Carstens E. B., Faulkner P. 1984; Nucleotide sequence of the pl0 polypeptide gene of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Virology 139:414–418
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Luckow V. A., Summers M. D. 1988; Signals important for highlevel expression of foreign genes in Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus expression vectors. Virology 67:56–71
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Manley J. L., Sharp P. A., Gefter M. L. 1979; RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei: identification and comparison of adenovirus 2 encoded transcripts synthesized in vitro and in vivo. Journal of Molecular Biology 135:171–197
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Matsuura Y., Possee R. D., Bishop D. H. L. 1986; Expression of the S-coded genes of lymphocytic choriomeningitis arenavirus using a baculovirus vector. Journal of General Virology 67:1515–1529
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Matsuura Y., Possee R. D., Overton H. A., Bishop D. H. L. 1987; Baculovirus expression vectors: the requirements for high level expression of protein, including glycoproteins. Journal of General Virology 68:1233–1250
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Possee R. D., Howard S. C. 1987; Analysis of the polyhedrin gene promoter of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Nuclear Acids Research 15:10233–10248
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Rohel D. Z., Cochran M. A., Faulkner P. 1983; Characterization of two abundant mRNAs of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus present late in infection. Virology 124:357–365
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Romanowski V., Bishop D. H. L. 1985; Conserved sequences and coding of two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (WE and ARM) and Pichinde arenavirus. Virus Research 2:35–51
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Romanowski V., Matsuura Y., Bishop D. H. L. 1985; Complete sequence of the S RNA of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (WE strain) compared to that of Pichinde arenavirus. Virus Research 3:101–114
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Smith G. E., Vlak J. M., Summers M. D. 1982; In vitro translation of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus early and late mRNAs. Journal of Virology 44:199–208
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Smith G. E., Summers M. D., Fraser M. J. 1983a; Production of human beta interferon in insect cells infected with a baculovirus expression vector. Molecular and Cellular Biology 3:2156–2165
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Smith G. E., Vlak J. M., Summers M. D. 1983b; Physical analysis of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus transcripts for polyhedrin and 10,000 molecular weight protein. Journal of Virology 45:215–225
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Takehara K., Morikawa S., Bishop D. H. L. 1990; Characterization of baculovirus-expressed Rift Valley fever virus glycoproteins synthesized in insect cells. Virus Research (in press)
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Weyer U., Possee R. D. 1988; Functional analysis of the pl0 gene 5′ leader sequence of Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus. Nucleic Acids Research 16:3635–3653
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Weyer U., Possee R. D. 1989; Analysis of the promoter of the Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus pl0 gene. Journal of General Virology 70:203–208
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-10-2551
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-72-10-2551
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error