1887

Abstract

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gene 62 encodes a protein with a predicted of 140000 (140K) which has considerable amino acid identity with the major immediate early (IE) protein Vmwl75 (ICP4) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Vmwl75 is an essential virus polypeptide with a pivotal role in the activation of early and late viral gene expression and also in the repression of IE gene expression. The VZV 140K protein has been shown to function as a strong transcriptional activator in transfection assays and largely complements for the loss of Vmwl75 function in HSV-1. We report the results of cotransfection experiments which demonstrate that the 140K protein strongly represses expression from its own promoter, that of gene 62, thus establishing further functional similarity between it and Vmwl75. However, whereas Vmwl75 can substitute for the 140K protein in repression of the gene 62 promoter, the 140K protein does not repress the HSV-1 IE3 promoter in the reciprocal experiment. The integrity of a domain of Vmwl75 (designated region 2), previously shown to be crucial for repression of the HSV-1 IE3 promoter, is also required for repression of the gene 62 promoter. Moreover, a similar requirement for the highly similar region 2 of the 140K protein for repression is demonstrated, suggesting that VZV 140K protein and HSV-1 Vmwl75 autoregulate IE gene expression by a related mechanism.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-71-12-2999
1990-12-01
2022-12-07
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/71/12/JV0710122999.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-71-12-2999&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bradford M. M. 1976; A rapid and sensitive method for the quantitation of microgram quantities of protein utilizing the principle of protein-dye binding. Analytical Biochemistry 72:248–254
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Corsalo C. M., Person M. L. 1981; Enhancing the efficiency of DNA-mediated gene transfer in mammalian cells. Somatic Cell Genetics 7:603–616
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Davison A. J., Scott J. E. 1986; The complete DNA sequence of varicella-zoster virus. Journal of General Virology 67:1759–1816
    [Google Scholar]
  4. DeLuca N. A., Schaffer P. A. 1988; Physical and functional domains of the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4. Journal of Virology 62:732–743
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Disney G. H., Everett R. D. 1990; A herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinant with both copies of the Vmwl75 coding sequences replaced by the homologous varicella-zoster virus open reading frame. Journal of General Virology 71:2681–2689
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Everett R. D. 1984; Transactivation of transcription by herpesvirus products. Requirements for two HSV-1 immediate-early polypeptides for maximum activity. EMBO Journal 3:3135–3141
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Everett R. D. 1987; The regulation of transcription of viral and cellular genes by herpesvirus immediate-early gene products. Anticancer Research 7:589–604
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Everett R. D., Dunlop M. 1984; Transactivation of plasmid borne promoters by adenovirus and several herpes group viruses. Nucleic Acids Research 12:5969–5978
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Faber S. W., Wilcox K. W. 1986; Association of the herpes simplex virus regulatory protein ICP4 with specific nucleotide sequences in DNA. Nucleic Acids Research 14:6067–6083
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Felser J. M., Straus S. E., Ostrove J. M. 1987; Varicella-zoster virus complements herpes simplex virus type 1 temperature-sensitive mutants. Journal of Virology 61:225–228
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Felser J. M., Kinchington P. R., Inchauspe G., Straus S. E., Ostrove J. M. 1988; Cell lines containing varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 62 and expressing the “IE” 175 protein complement 1CP4 mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1. Journal of Virology 62:2076–2082
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Gorman C. M., Moffat L. F., Howard B. H. 1982; Recombinant genomes which express chloramphenicol acetyltrans-ferase in mammalian cells. Molecular and Cellular Biology 2:1044–1051
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Honess R. W., Roizman B. 1975; Regulation of herpes virus macromolecular synthesis: sequential transition of polypeptide synthesis requires functional viral polypeptides. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A.: 721276–1280
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Inchauspe G., Nagpal S., Ostrove J. M. 1989; Mapping of two varicella-zoster virus-encoded genes that activate the expression of viral early and late genes. Virology 173:700–709
    [Google Scholar]
  15. McGeoch D. J., Dolan J. A., Donald S., Brauer D. H. K. 1986; Complete DNA sequence of the short repeat region in the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1. Nucleic Acids Research 14:1727–1764
    [Google Scholar]
  16. McKee T. A., Disney G. H., Everett R. D., Preston C. M. 1990; Control of expression of the varicella-zoster virus major immediate early gene. Journal of General Virology 71:897–906
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Michael N., Spector D., Mavromara-Nazos P., Kristie P. M., Roizman B. 1988; The DNA binding properties of the major regulatory protein alpha 4 of herpes simplex virus. Science 239:1531–1534
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Muller M. T. 1987; Binding of the herpes simplex virus immediate- early gene product 1CP4 to its own transcription start site. Journal of Virology 61:858–865
    [Google Scholar]
  19. O’Hare P., Hayward G. S. 1985; Three trans-acting regulatory proteins of herpes simplex virus modulate immediate-early gene expression in a pathway involving positive and negative feedback regulation. Journal of Virology 56:723–733
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Paterson T., Everett R. D. 1988; Mutational dissection of the HSV-1 immediate-early protein Vmwl75 involved in transcriptional transactivation and repression. Virology 156:186–196
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Preston C. M. 1979; Control of herpes simplex virus type 1 mRNA synthesis in cells infected with wild-type or the temperature sensitive mutant tsK. Journal of Virology 29:275–284
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Preston V. G., Davison A. J., Marsden H. S., Timbury M. C., Subak-Sharpe J. H., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Recombinants between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2: analyses of genome structures and expression of immediate early polypeptides. Journal of Virology 28:499–517
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Roberts M. S., Boundy A., O’Hare P., Pizzorno M. C., Ciufo D. M., Hayward G. S. 1988; Direct correlation between a negative autoregulatory response element at the cap site of the herpes simplex virus type 1 IE175 (α4) promoter and a specific site for the IE175 (ICP4) protein. Journal of Virology 62:4307–4320
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Shepard A. A., Imbalzano A. N., DeLuca N. A. 1989; Separation of primary structural components conferring autoregulation, transactivation and DNA binding properties to the herpes simplex virus transcriptional regulatory protein ICP4. Journal of Virology 63:3714–3728
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Wagner E. K. 1985; Individual HSV transcripts: characterisation of specific genes. In The Herpesviruses 3 pp 45–104 Roizman B. Edited by New York & London: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Watson R. J., Clements J. B. 1980; A herpes simplex virus type 1 function continuously required for early and late virus RNA synthesis. Nature; London: 285329–330
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-71-12-2999
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-71-12-2999
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error