1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Mice were immunized with eight different serotypes of avian paramyxovirus (PMV). The number of splenocytes that formed antibody to PMV-infected Madin–Darby bovine kidney cells was determined by immunoperoxidase staining. Microscopic examination revealed brown plaques of cell surface or inclusion body-like antigen comprising the glycoprotein or nucleoprotein-polymerase complex, respectively. The IgG response to virus glycoprotein was priming-dependent and 99% serotype-specific, a value which exceeds that of PMV typing using avian serology. The response to inclusion body-like antigens was more variable and less priming-dependent and suggested cross-reactivities between PMV-1 and PMV-3 or -9. The primary IgM response also included a 1 to 10% non-specific antibody response to host antigens revealed by neuraminidase treatment.

Keyword(s): AFC assay , avian , paramyxoviruses and serotype
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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-2-315
1989-02-01
2022-12-04
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