1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Ten Japanese field isolates of beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) were transmitted to by inoculation with sap from rootlets of sugar-beet seedlings, to which the virus had been transmitted by the fungus . RNA extracted from BNYVV particles obtained from the leaves was analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Some isolates contained RNA-1 (7·1 kb), RNA-2 (4·8 kb), RNA-3 (1·85 kb) and RNA-4 (1·5 kb) and the others contained, in addition, RNA-5 (1·4 kb). Further isolates, derived from single lesions produced by these isolates, had a variety of RNA compositions. Some contained only RNA-1 and RNA-2. Others contained, in addition, RNA-3, RNA-4, RNA-5 or RNA-6 (1·0 kb), or combinations of two or three of these components. Such isolates generally maintained their RNA composition on further subculture, and their particles had length distributions corresponding to their RNA components. Isolates containing RNA-1 + 2 + 3 caused yellow or strongly chlorotic local lesions in and , and caused systemic stunting and yellow mosaic in and, occasionally, in . In contrast, isolates containing RNA-1 + 2 + 4 or 1 + 2 + 5 induced chlorotic lesions, those containing RNA-1 + 2 + 6 or 1 + 2 induced faint chlorotic lesions, and none of these isolates easily infected systemically. Isolates containing different combinations of RNA-3,-4 and -5 induced more severe symptoms than those containing a single RNA. Such synergistic effects occurred between RNA-3 and RNA-4 or RNA-5, or between RNA-4 and RNA-5 or RNA-6, but not between RNA-3 and RNA-6, or between RNA-5 and RNA-6. These small RNA species therefore contain the genetic determinant(s) for lesion type and for ability to infect and systemically. RNA-1 and RNA-2 are viral genome components. The other RNA components have some characteristics of viral satellite nucleic acids but they may not all be dispensable if the BNYVV isolates are to survive in nature.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-12-3399
1989-12-01
2022-10-07
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/70/12/JV0700123399.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-12-3399&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Abe H., Ui T. 1986; Host range of Polymyxa betae Keskin strains in rhizomania-infested soils of sugar beet in Japan. Annals of the Phytopathological Society of Japan 52:394–403
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Boedtkbr H. 1971; Conformation-independent molecular weight determinations of RNA by gel electrophoresis. Biochimica et biophysica acta 240:448–453
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bouzoubaa S., Guilley H., Ionard G., Richards K., Putz C. 1985; Nucleotide sequence analysis of RNA-3 and RNA-4 of beet necrotic yellow vein virus, isolates F2 and G1. Journal of General Virology 66:1553–1564
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bouzoubaa S., Ziegler V., Beck D., Guilley H., Richards K., Jonard G. 1986; Nucleotide sequence of beet necrotic yellow vein virus RNA-2. Journal of General Virology 67:1689–1700
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bouzoubaa S., Quillet L., Guilley H., Jonard G., Richards K. 1987; Nucleotide sequence of beet necrotic yellow vein virus RNA-1. Journal of General Virology 68:615–626
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Brosius I., Palmer M. L., Kennedy P. J., Noller H. F. 1978; Complete nucleotide sequence of a 16S ribosomal RNA gene from Escherichia coli . Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesU.S.A 75:4801–4805
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Brosius J., Dull T. J., Noller H. F. 1980; Complete nucleotide sequence of a 23S ribosomal RNA gene from Escherichia coli . Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesU.S.A 77:201–204
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Burgermeister W., Koenig R., Weich H., Sebald W., Lesemann D. E. 1986; Diversity of the RNAs in thirteen isolates of beet necrotic yellow vein virus in Chenopodium quinoa detected by means of cloned cDNAs. Journal of Phytopathology 115:229–242
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Dahlberg A. E., Dingman C. W., Peacock A. C. 1969; Electrophoretic characterization of bacterial polyribosomes in agarose-acrylamide composite gels. Journal of Molecular Biology 41:139–147
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Goelet P., Lomonossoff G. P., Butler P. I. G., Akam M. E., Gait M. J., Karn J. 1982; Nucleotide sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA. Proceedings of the National Academy of SciencesU.S.A 79:5818–5822
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Kiguchi T., Tamada T., Saito M., Harada T., Ugaki M., Motoyoshi F. 1988; Comparison of four small RNAs of beet necrotic yellow vein virus in association with symptom expression. Fifth International Congress of Plant PathologyKyoto, Japan, 1988 Abstracts of Papers 453
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Koenig R., Burgermeister W., Weich H., Sebald W., Kothe C. 1986; Uniform RNA patterns of beet necrotic yellow vein virus in sugarbeet roots, but not in leaves from several plant species. Journal of General Virology 67:2043–2046
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Kuszala M., Ziegler V., Bouzoubaa S., Richards K., Putz C., Guilley H., Jonard G. 1986; Beet necrotic yellow vein virus: different isolates are serologically similar but differ in RNA composition. Annals of Applied Biology 109:155–162
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lehrach H., Diamond D., Wozney J. M., Boedtker H. 1977; RNA molecular weight determinations by gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, a critical reexamination. Biochemistry 16:4743–4751
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Lemaire O., Merdinoglu D., Valentin P., Putz C., Ziegler-Graff V., Guilley H., Jonard G., Richards K. 1988; Effect of beet necrotic yellow vein virus RNA composition on transmission by Polymyxa betae . Virology 162:232–235
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Murant A. F., Mayo M. A. 1982; Satellites of plant viruses. Annual Review of Phytophathology 20:49–70
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Putz C. 1977; Composition and structure of beet necrotic yellow vein virus. Journal of General Virology 35:397–401
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Richards K., Jonard G., Guilley H., Ziegler V., Putz C. 1985; In vitro translation of beet necrotic yellow vein virus RNA and studies of sequence homology among the RNA species using cloned cDNA probes. Journal of General Virology 66:345–350
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Saito M., Harada T., Kiguchi T., Tamada T. 1988; Cloning of cDNA to beet necrotic yellow vein virus and its use for the RNA detection by photobiotin-labelling. Fifth International Congress of Plant PathologyKyoto, Japan 1988: Abstracts of Papers 45
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Shirako Y., Brakke M. K. 1984a; Two purified RNAs of soil-borne wheat mosaic virus are needed for infection. Journal of General Virology 65:119–127
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Shirako Y., Brakke M. K. 1984b; Spontaneous deletion mutation of soil-borne wheat mosaic virus RNA-II. Journal of General Virology 65:855–858
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Tamada T. 1975; Beet necrotic yellow vein virus. CMI/AAB Descriptions of Plant Viruses144
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Tamada T., Baba T. 1973; Beet necrotic yellow vein virus from rhizomania-affected sugar beet in Japan. Annals of the Phytopathological Society of Japan 39:325–332
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Tamada T., Hagita T. 1982; Detection of beet necrotic yellow vein virus by ELISA. Annals of the Phytopathological Society of Japan 48:399–400 Abstract
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Tamada T., Abe H., Saito M., Kiguchi T., &. Harada T. 1988; The role of beet necrotic yellow vein virus RNA species in symptom expression and fungus transmission. Fifth International Congress of Plant PathologyKyoto, Japan 1988: Abstracts of Papers 31
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-12-3399
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-12-3399
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error