1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

The sequence of the 3′-terminal 1611 nucleotides of the genome of the tobacco veinal necrosis strain of potato virus Y (PVY) was determined. The sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1285 nucleotides, of which the start was not identified, and an untranslated region of 316 nucleotides upstream of a poly(A) tract. Comparison of the open reading frame with the amino-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein enabled mapping of the start of the coat protein at amino acid –267, and indicated that maturation of this protein requires proteolytic processing from a larger polyprptein precursor at a glutamine/glycine dipeptide sequence. The coat protein of PVY displayed significant (51 to 63%) sequence homology to the coat proteins of four other potyviruses, tobacco etch virus, tobacco vein mottling virus, plum pox virus and sugarcane mosaic virus. Even higher sequence homology (91%) was detected with the coat protein of a fifth potyvirus, pepper mottle virus (PeMV). This homology was of the same level as found between the coat proteins of PVY and a second strain of this virus, PVY. Since, moreover, PVY and PeMV were the only potyviruses displaying homology in the 3′-terminal, non-translated regions of their genomes, we conclude that PeMV should be regarded as a strain of PVY.

Keyword(s): PeMV , potyviruses and PVYN
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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-70-1-229
1989-01-01
2022-08-10
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