1887

Abstract

Summary

Measles virus envelope haemagglutinin (H) was purified rapidly with Triton X-100-solubilized virions by a two-step anion-exchange chromatography using fast protein liquid chromatography. The purity of the glycoprotein in its dimeric form was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE followed by silver staining or autoradiography. The purified H glycoprotein was further freed from contaminating detergent by dialysis of octylglucoside detergent. This purification procedure, together with subsequent lyophilization and storage at -70°C of the H glycoprotein which was incorporated into phospholipid vesicles allowed the full preservation of its haemagglutinating activity, its reactivity with a monoclonal anti-H antibody that recognized a conformational epitope and its capacity to elicit anti-H antibodies with haemagglutination-inhibiting and neutralizing activities.

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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-69-8-2061
1988-08-01
2021-10-21
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