1887

Abstract

Summary

The delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in mice infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was measured by ear swelling following a challenge with heat-treated MCMV. DTH was dose-dependent and could be detected as early as 3 days post-infection with peak responses occurring between days 15 and 21 postinfection. The DTH response was found to be specific for MCMV since it could not be elicited by either herpes simplex virus type 1 or influenza A virus in MCMV-primed mice. The elicited DTH response was greater in mice primed with attenuated compared with virulent MCMV. The DTH response was shown to correlate positively with the genetically determined resistance status of mouse strains to this virus. Previous research has shown that resistance to lethal infection with MCMV is controlled by H-2-linked genes since mice having the k haplotype are more resistant than mice having the b or d haplotype of the H-2 complex. Also, non-H-2-linked genes in CBA, C3H, C57BL/10 and probably other strains confer resistance. Resistant strains (C3H [H-2], CBA [H-2]) developed greater DTH responses than those of susceptible strains (BALB/c [H-2], C57BL/10 [H-2]) inoculated with the same dose of virus. In addition, the genetically resistant mouse strains BIO. BR [H-2] and BALB. K [H-2] gave a significantly greater DTH response than that of the corresponding congenic strains C57BL/10 [H-2], BALB/c [H-2] and BALB. B [H-2] which are genetically susceptible to the virus. Also, the DTH response of C57BL/10 [H-2] was significantly higher than that of BALB. B [H-2] which correlates with their relative genetic resistance to MCMV, indicating the importance of non-H-2-linked genes. Furthermore, in addition to the response of greater magnitude, resistant strains (CBA, C3H, B10.BR) produced DTH responses to MCMV by day 3 compared with day 5 post-infection for susceptible BALB/c mice. These findings indicate that the magnitude and the time of appearance of the DTH response correlates positively with the genetically determined resistance status, although the role of DTH responses in controlling MCMV infections remains to be determined.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-9-2379
1987-09-01
2021-10-22
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/68/9/JV0680092379.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-9-2379&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Allan J. E., Shellam G. R. 1984; Genetic control of murine cytomegalovirus infection: virus titres in resistant and susceptible strains of mice. Archives of Virology 81:139–150
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Allan J. E., Shellam G. R., Grundy(Chalmer) J. E. 1982; Effect of murine cytomegalovirus infection on mitogen responses in genetically resistant and susceptible mice. Infection and Immunity 36:235–242
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bancroft G. J., Shellam G. R., Chalmer I. E. 1981; Genetic influences on the augmentation of natural killer (NK) cells during murine cytomegalovirus infection: correlation with patterns of resistance. Journal of Immunology 126:988–994
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Chalmer J. E., Mackenzie J. S., Stanley N. F. 1977; Resistance to murine cytomegalovirus linked to the major histocompatibility complex of the mouse. Journal of General Virology 37:107–114
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Chong K., Mims C. A. 1982; Delayed hypersensitivity to murine cytomegalovirus and its depression during pregnancy. Infection and Immunity 37:54–59
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Grundy(Chalmer) J. E., Melief C. J. M. 1982; Effect of Nu/Nu gene on genetically determined resistance to murine cytomegalovirus. Journal of General Virology 61:133–136
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Grundy I. E., Shearer G. M. 1984; The effect of cytomegalovirus infection on the host response to foreign and hapten-modified self histocompatibility antigens. Transplantation 37:484–490
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Grundy(Chalmer) J. E., Mackenzie J. S., Stanley N. F. 1981; Influence of H-2 and non-H-2 genes on resistance to murine cytomegalovirus infection. Infection and Immunity 32:277–286
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Harnett G. B., Shellam G. R. 1982; Variation in murine cytomegalovirus replication in fibroblasts from different mouse strains in vitro.Correlation with in vivoresistance. Journal of General Virology 62:39–47
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Harnett G. B., Shellam G. R. 1985; The role of interferon in the expression of genetically determined resistance to murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). In Progress in Leukocyte Biology. Genetic Control of Host Resistance to Infection and Malignancy 3 pp 181–186 Skamene E. Edited by New York: Alan R. Liss;
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Ho M. 1980; Role of specific cytotoxic lymphocytes in cellular immunity against murine cytomegalovirus. Infection and Immunity 27:767–776
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Howard R. J., Najarian J. S. 1974; Cytomegalovirus-induced immune suppression. I. Humoral immunity. Clinical and Experimental Immunology 18:109–118
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Howard R. J., Mattson D. M., Seidal M. v., Balfour H. H. Jr 1978; Cell-mediated immunity to murine cytomegalovirus. Journal of Infectious Diseases 138:597–603
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Howes E. L., Taylor W., Mitchison N. A., Simpson E. 1979; MHC matching shows that at least two T-cell subsets determine resistance to HSV. Nature; London: 27767–68
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Leung K. N., Ada G. L. 1980; Production of DTH in the mouse to influenza virus: comparison with conditions for stimulation of cytotoxic T cells. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology 12:129–139
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Mccordock H. A., Simth M. G. 1936; The visceral lesions produced in mice by the salivary gland virus of mice. Journal of Experimental Medicine 63:303–310
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Mitchell G. F., Anders R. F., Brown G. V., Handman E. A., Roberts-Thomsen I. C., Chapman C. B., Forsyth K. P., Cruise K., Cruise K. M. 1982; Analysis of infection characteristics and antiparasite immune responses in resistant compared with susceptible hosts. Immunological Reviews 61:137–188
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Nash A. A., Gell G. H. 1983; Membrane phenotype of murine effector and suppressor T cells involved in delayed hypersensitivity and protective immunity to herpes simplex virus. Cellular Immunology 75:348–355
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Nash A. A., Field H. J., Quartey-Papafio R. 1980; Cell-mediated immunity in herpes simplex virus-infected mice: induction, characterization and antiviral effects of delayed type hypersensitivity. Journal of General Virology 48:351–357
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Nash A. A., Gell G. H., Wildy P. 1981; Tolerance and immunity in mice infected with herpes simplex virus: simultaneous induction of protective immunity and tolerance to delayed-type hypersensitivity. Immunology 43:153–159
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Osborn J. E., Mefearis D. N. Jr 1966; Studies of relationship between mouse cytomegalovirus and interferon. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 121:819–824
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Osborn J. E., Mefearis D. N. Jr 1967; Suppression of interferon and antibody and multiplication of Newcastle disease virus in cytomegalovirus infected mice. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 124:347–353
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Osborn J. E., Walker D. L. 1970; Virulence and attenuation of murine cytomegalovirus. Infection and Immunity 3:228–236
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Reddehase M. J., Koszinowski U. H. 1984; Significance of herpesvirus immediate early gene expression in cellular immunity to cytomegalovirus infection. Nature; London: 312369–371
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Reddehase M. J., Keil G. M., Koszinowski U. H. 1984a; The cytolytic T lymphocyte response to the murine cytomegalovirus. I. Distinct maturation stages of cytolytic T lymphocytes constitute the cellular immune response during acute infection of mice with the murine cytomegalovirus. Journal of Immunology 132:482–489
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Reddehase M. J., Keil G. M., Koszinowski U. H. 1984b; The cytolytic T lymphocyte response to the murine cytomegalovirus. II. Detection of virus replication stage-specific antigens by separate populations of in vivoactive cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors. European Journal of Immunology 14:56–61
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Reddehase M. J., Weiland F., Munch K., Jonjic S., Luske A., Koszinowski U. H. 1985; Interstitial murine cytomegalovirus pneumonia after irradiation: characterization of cells that limit viral replication during established infection of the lungs. Journal of Virology 55:264–273
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Schrier R. D., Pizer L. I., Moorhead J. W. 1982; Delayed hypersensitivity to herpes simplex: murine model. Infection and Immunity 35:566–571
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Shellam G. R., Grundy J. E., Harnett G. B., Allan J. E. 1983; Natural resistance against cytomegalovirus and other viruses of mice. In Progress in Immunology 5 pp 1209–1217 Yamamura Y., Tada T. Edited by Tokyo: Academic Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Sinickas V. G., Ashman R. B., Blanden R. v. 1985a; The cytotoxic response to murine cytomegalovirus. I. Parameters in vivo . Journal of General Virology 66:747–755
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Sinickas V. G., Ashman R. B. 1985b; The cytotoxic response to murine cytomegalovirus. II. In vitrorequirements for generation of cytotoxic T cells. Journal of General Virology 66:757–765
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Sinickas V. G., Ashman R. B., Hodgkin P. D., Blanden R. v. 1985c; The cytotoxic response to murine cytomegalovirus. III. Lymphokine release and cytotoxicity are dependent upon phenotypically similar immune cell populations. Journal of General Virology 66:2551–2561
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Starr S. E., Allison A. C. 1977; Role of T lymphocytes in recovery from murine cytomegalovirus infection. Infection and Immunity 17:458–462
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-9-2379
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-9-2379
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error