1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

We have used antisera raised against synthetic oligopeptides to characterize the protein products from herpes simplex virus type 1 gene U11. These antisera recognized predominantly polypeptides of apparent molecular weight 21000 and 22000, but also polypeptides of apparent molecular weight 17500, 15000, 14000 and 11000. Tryptic peptide fingerprint analysis confirmed that these polypeptides were all closely related. The 21000 and 22000 molecular weight polypeptides were shown to be DNA-binding proteins, and immune electron microscopy demonstrated their strong localization within nucleoli of infected cells.

Keyword(s): DNA-binding protein , HSV-1 and nucleolus
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1987-07-01
2022-01-17
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