1887

Abstract

Summary

The population of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) genomes extracted from extracellular virions are double-stranded, linear DNA molecules of about 160 kilobase pairs (kbp) each composed of a central segment of 110 to 112 kbp and 36% (G + C) (i.e. ‘light’ or L-DNA) linked to direct reiterations of a 1·44 kbp repeat unit of 71 % (G + C) (i.e. ‘heavy’ or H-DNA) at each terminus. In this paper, we show that the population of HVS DNA molecules contains approximately equal concentrations of genomes with all possible integral numbers of complete repeat units (i.e. from > 30 to 1) at either ‘left’ or ‘right’ ends but that all molecular ends are derived by a unique cleavage at a site close to the single restriction endonuclease site of the H-DNA repeat unit. Junctions of proximal H-DNA repeat units with L-DNA occur at, or very close to, the sequence present at the molecular ends. The transition from L- to H-DNA occurs abruptly at this site at the ‘right’ end of the L-DNA component but some rearranged restriction enzyme cleavage sites typical of H-DNA are found within the first 0·8 kbp of the L-DNA sequences at the ‘left’ H-L DNA junction. HVS appears to provide an extreme example of the general process whereby herpesvirus DNAs are matured from concatemeric intermediates by a site-specific cleavage/recombination process involving random choice between equivalent sites for the initiation of the process and with choices between alternative termination sites being limited by a headful packaging mechanism.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-4-1049
1987-04-01
2021-10-17
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/68/4/JV0680041049.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-4-1049&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Albrecht M., Darai G., Flugel R. M. 1985; Analysis of the genomic termini of Tupaia herpesvirus DNA by restriction mapping and nucleotide sequencing. Journal of Virology 56:466–474
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Bankier A. T., Barrell B. G. 1983; Shotgun DNA sequencing. Techniques in Life Sciences 85 Ireland: Elsevier;
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Bankier A. T., Dietrich W., Baer R., Barrell B. G., Colbere-Garapin F., Fleckenstein B., Bodemer W. 1985; Terminal repetitive sequences in herpesvirus saimiri virion DNA. Journal of Virology 55:133–139
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Bodemer W., Knust E., Angermuller S., Fleckenstein B. 1984; Immediate-early transcription of herpesvirus saimiri. Journal of Virology 51:452–457
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Bornkamm G. W., Delius H., Fleckenstein B., Werner F.-J., Mulder C. 1976; Structure of herpesvirus saimiri genomes: arrangements of heavy and light sequences in the M genome. Journal of Virology 19:154–161
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Deiss L. P., Frenkel N. 1986; Herpes simplex virus amplicon: cleavage of concatemeric DNA is linked to packaging and involves amplification of the terminally reiteratedasequence. Journal of Virology 57:933–941
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Deiss L. P., Chou J., Frenkel N. 1986; Functional domains within theasequence involved in the cleavagepackaging of herpes simplex virus DNA. Journal of Virology 59:605–618
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Desrosiers R. C., Burghoff R. L., Bakker A., Kamine J. 1984; Construction of replication-competent herpesvirus saimiri deletion mutants. Journal of Virology 49:343–348
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Elder J. K., Amos A., Southern E. M., Shippey G. A. 1983; Measurement of DNA length by gel electrophoresis. I. Improved accuracy of mobility measurements using a digital microdensitometer and computer processing. Analytical Biochemistry 128:223–226
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Falk L. A., Wolfe L. G., Deinhardt F. 1972; Isolation of herpesvirus saimiri from blood of squirrel monkeys(Saimiri sciureus). Journal of the National Cancer Institute 48:1499–1505
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Fleckenstein B., Deinhardt F. 1982; Herpesvirus saimiri and herpesvirus ateles. In The Herpesviruses 1 pp 253–332 Roizman B. Edited by New York: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Fleckenstein B., Wolf H. 1974; Purification and properties of herpesvirus saimiri DNA. Virology 58:55–64
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Fleckenstein B., Bornkamm G. W., Ludwig H. 1975; Repetitive sequences in complete and defective genomes of herpesvirus saimiri. Journal of Virology 15:398–406
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Frenkel N. 1981; Defective interfering herpesviruses. In The Human Herpesviruses - An Interdisciplinary Perspective pp 91–120 Nahmias A. J., Dowdle W. R., Schinazi R. F. Edited by New York: Elsevier/North-Holland;
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Honess R. W. 1984; Herpes simplex and ‘the herpes complex’: diverse observations and a unifying hypothesis. Journal of General Virology 65:2077–2107
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Knust E., Schirm S., Dietrich W., Bodemer W., Kolb E., Fleckenstein B. 1983; Cloning of herpesvirus saimiri DNA fragments representing the entire L-region of the genome. Gene 25:281–289
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Koomey J. M., Mulder C., Burghoff R. L., Fleckenstein B., Desrosiers R. C. 1984; Deletion of DNA sequences in a non-oncogenic variant of herpesvirus saimiri. Journal of Virology 50:662–665
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ladin B. F., Blankenship M. L., Ben-Porat T. 1980; Replication of herpesvirus DNA. V. Maturation of concatemeric DNA of pseudorabies virus to genome length is related to capsid formation. Journal of Virology 33:1151–1164
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Maniatis T., Fritsch E. F., Sambrook J. 1982 Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory;
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Messing J. 1983; New M13 vectors for cloning. Methods in Enzymology 101:20–78
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Norrander I., Kampe T., Messing J. 1983; Construction of improved M13 vectors using oligodeoxynucleotide- directed mutagenesis. Gene 26:101–106
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Randall R. E., Honess R. W. 1980; Proteins of herpesvirus saimiri: identification of two virus polypeptides released into the culture medium of productively infected cells. Journal of General Virology 51:445–449
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Randall R. E., Honess R. W., O’Hare P. 1983; Proteins specified by herpesvirus saimiri: identification and properties of virus-specific polypeptides in productively infected cells. Journal of General Virology 64:19–35
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Rigby P. W. J., Dieckmann M., Rhodes C. 1977; Labelling deoxyribonucleic acid to high specific activityin vitroby nick translation with DNA polymerase I. Journal of Molecular Biology 113:237–251
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Roizman B. 1982; The family herpesviridae: general description, taxonomy and classification. In The Herpesviruses 1 pp 1–23 Roizman B. Edited by New York: Plenum Press;
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Sanger F., Nicklen S., Coulson A. R. 1977; DNA sequencing with chain terminating inhibitors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A: 745463–5467
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Schaffer H. E., Sederoff R. R. 1981; Improved estimation of DNA fragment lengths from agarose gels. Analytical Biochemistry 115:113–122
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Smith E. P. 1986 Analysis of herpesvirus saimiri gene expression by cDNA cloning Ph.D. thesis Council for National Academic Awards; London:
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Spaete R. R., Mocarski E. S. 1985; The asequence of the cytomegalovirus genome functions as a cleavage/packaging signal for herpes simplex virus defective genomes. Journal of Virology 54:817–824
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Stow N. D., Mcmonagle E. C., Davison A. J. 1983; Fragments from both termini of the herpes simplex type 1 genome contain signals required for the encapsidation of viral DNA. Nucleic Acids Research 11:8205–8220
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Tamashiro J. C., Spector D. H. 1986; Terminal structure and heterogeneity in human cytomegalovirus strain AD 169. Journal of Virology 59:591–604
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Tamashiro J. C., Filpula D., Friedmann T., Spector D. H. 1984; Structure of the heterogeneous L-S junction region of human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 DNA. Journal of Virology 52:541–548
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Tracy S., Desrosiers R. C. 1980; RNA from unique and repetitive DNA sequences of herpesvirus saimiri. Virology 100:204–207
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Varmuza S. L., Smiley J. R. 1985; Signals for site-specific cleavage of herpes simplex virus DNA: maturation involves two separate cleavage events at sites distal to the recognition site. Cell 41:793–802
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Vlazny D. A., Kwong A. D., Frenkel N. 1982; Site specific cleavage/packaging of herpes simplex virus DNA and the selective maturation of nucleocapsids containing full length viral DNA. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A: 791423–1427
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Yanisch-Perron C., Vieira I., Messing J. 1985; Improved M13 phage cloning vectors and host strains: nucleotide sequences of the M13mpl8 and pUC19 vectors. Gene 33:103–119
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-4-1049
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-68-4-1049
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error