1887

Abstract

Summary

The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the structural proteins of the TC-83 vaccine strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus have been determined from a cDNA clone containing the 26S mRNA coding region. A cDNA clone encoding the equivalent region of the virulent parent VEE virus [Trinidad donkey strain (TRD)] has been sequenced previously. Comparison of the sequences of the TC-83 and TRD cDNA clones revealed 13 nucleotide differences. Neither the organization of the structural proteins (5′-capsid-E-E-6K-E-3′) nor the length (3762 nucleotides) of the open reading frame coding for the viral polyprotein precursor was altered during attenuation. Of the 13 nucleotide differences between the cDNA clones of TC-83 and TRD, nine occurred in the dominant population of the respective genomic RNAs from plaque-purified viruses. Six of the nine mutations were clustered in the E surface glycoprotein gene. All five of the nucleotide changes which produced non-conservative amino acid substitutions in the encoded proteins were located in the E gene. Two mutations occurred in the E glycoprotein gene; one was silent and the other did not alter the chemical character of the E protein. One nucleotide difference was found in the non-coding region immediately preceding the 5′-end of the 26S mRNA. The E and non-coding region mutations are candidates for the molecular determinants of VEE virus neurovirulence.

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1986-09-01
2021-10-20
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