1887

Abstract

Summary

The genes of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can be divided into at least three temporally regulated groups termed immediate early (IE), early and late. We have studied in detail the expression of a member of the late class of genes, US11, which encodes a polypeptide of apparent molecular weight 21K. Highly specific and sensitive probes were used to monitor US11 RNA and protein synthesis during HSV-1 infection of tissue culture cells in the presence and absence of phosphonoacetic acid, an inhibitor of viral DNA replication. The results were compared with a similar study of the products of a delayed early gene, US6, encoding glycoprotein D (gD). It was found that the patterns of RNA and protein synthesis from US11 were significantly different to those of gD. US11 products appeared later and accumulated until late in infection, while gD RNA was significantly reduced at late times. In the presence of the inhibitor of DNA synthesis, US11 gene expression was reduced 50- to 100-fold while gD expression was reduced five- to tenfold. We conclude that US11 behaves as a true late gene during HSV-1 infection. However, the use of sensitive assays, which allowed the detection of very low levels of US11 gene products under conditions designed to eliminate DNA replication, brings into question the absolute requirement for DNA replication for the expression of a true late HSV-1 gene. These results are discussed in terms of current models for the regulation of late gene expression.

Keyword(s): expression , HSV-1 and late gene
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1986-05-01
2022-05-16
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