1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

We provide evidence that: (i) two variants lacking the I site at map coordinate 0.7 have been selected following I treatment of the DNA of herpes simplex virus type 2 strain HG52; (ii) one of these mutants had lost the 0.7 restriction site due to a deletion of approximately 150 base pairs and in the other the site loss was due to a similar sized sequence insertion; (iii) following I treatment, four variants with deletions ranging in size from 1.5 kb (in both TR and IR) to 9 kb in IR were isolated; (iv) substantial deletions in the long terminal repeat regions of HG52 are present with a frequency of 24% of genomes in the elite stock, a variant with a 3.75 kb deletion in IR making up 10% and one with a 1.5 kb deletion in both IR and TR making up 14%; (v) two of the variants isolated after I treatment of viral DNA were identical to the deletion prototype within the elite stock, suggesting that these variants were not generated as a result of I treatment but pre-existed in the viral DNA pool; (vi) the deletion variants were stably maintained during routine stock propagation, were viable and could be propagated as cloned populations; (vii) the deletions did not have a marked deleterious effect on the one-step growth kinetics of the virus.

Keyword(s): deletion , HSV-2 and mutants
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1305
1985-06-01
2022-07-01
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/jgv/66/6/JV0660061305.html?itemId=/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1305&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Aron G. M., Purifoy D. J. M., Schaffer P. A. 1975; DNA synthesis and DNA polymerase activity of herpes simplex virus type 1 temperature sensitive mutants. Journal of Virology 16:498–507
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Brown S. M., Ritchie D. A., Subak-Sharpe J. H. 1973; Genetic studies with herpes simplex virus type 1. The isolation of temperature-sensitive mutants, their arrangement into complementation groups and recombination analysis leading to a linkage map. Journal of General Virology 18:329–346
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Brown S. M., Harland J., Subak-Sharpe J. H. 1984; Isolation of restriction endonuclease site deletion mutants of herpes simplex virus. Journal of General Virology 65:1053–1068
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Campbell M. E. M., Palfreyman J. W., Preston C. M. 1984; Identification of herpes simplex virus DNA sequences which encode a trans-acting polypeptide responsible for stimulation of immediate early transcription. Journal of Molecular Biology 180:1–19
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Chartrand P., Stow N. D., Timbury M. C., Wilkie N. M. 1979; Physical mapping of paar mutations of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 by intertypic marker rescue. Journal of Virology 31:265–276
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Chartrand P., Crumpacker C. S., Schaffer P. A., Wilkie N. M. 1980; Physical and genetic analysis of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase locus. Virology 103:311–326
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Cortini R., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Physical maps for HSV type 2 DNA with five restriction endonucleases. Journal of General Virology 39:259–280
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Dargan D. J., Subak-Sharpe J. H. 1984; Isolation and characterization of revertants from fourteen herpes simplex virus type 1 (strain 17) temperature-sensitive mutants. Journal of General Virology 65:477–491
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Davison A. J., Wilkie N. M. 1981; Nucleotide sequences of the joint between the L and S segments of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. Journal of General Virology 55:315–331
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Davison A. J., Marsden H. S., Wilkie N. M. 1981; One functional copy of the long terminal repeat gene specifying the immediate early polypeptide IE 110 suffices for a productive infection of human foetal lung cells by herpes simplex virus. Journal of General Virology 55:179–191
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Esparza J., Purifoy D. J. M., Schaffer P. A., Benyesh-Melnick M. 1974; Isolation, complementation and preliminary phenotypic characterisation of temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2. Virology 57:554–565
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Everett R. D. 1984; Trans activation of transcription by herpes virus products: requirement for two HSV-1 immediate early polypeptides for maximum activity. EMBO Journal 13:3135–3141
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Hayward G. S., Frenkel N., Roizman B. 1975; Anatomy of herpes simplex virus DNA; strain differences and heterogeneity in the locations of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, U,. S,. A 72:1768–1772
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Lonsdale D. M. 1979; A rapid technique for distinguishing herpes simplex virus type 1 from type 2 by restriction enzyme technology. Lancet i:849–852
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Marsden H. S., Crombie I. K., Subak-Sharpe J. H. 1976; Control of protein synthesis in herpesvirus-infected cells: analysis of the polypeptides induced by wild-type and sixteen temperature-sensitive mutants of HSV strain 17. Journal of General Virology 31:347–373
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Marsden H. S., Stow N. D., Preston V. G., Timbury M. C., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Physical mapping of herpes simplex virus induced polypeptides. Journal of Virology 28:624–642
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Preston V. G., Davison A. J., Marsden H. S., Timbury M. C., Subak-Sharpe J. H., Wilkie N. M. 1978; Recombinants between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. Analysis of genome structure and expression of immediate early polypeptides. Journal of Virology 28:499–517
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Seth P., Rawls W. E., Duff R., Rapp F., Adam E., Melnick J. L. 1974; Antigenic differences between isolates of herpes virus type 2. Intervirology 3:1–14
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Skare J., Summers W. P., Summers W. C. 1975; Structure and function of herpes virus genomes. 1. Comparison of five HSV-1 and two HSV-2 strains by cleavage of their DNA with EcoRI restriction endonuclease. Journal of Virology 15:726–732
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Southern E. M. 1975; Detection of specific sequences among DNA fragments separated by gel electrophoresis. Journal of Molecular Biology 98:503–517
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Stow N. D., Wilkie N. M. 1976; An improved technique for obtaining enhanced infectivity with herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA. Journal of General Virology 33:447–458
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Thompson R. L., Deri G. B., Stevens I. G., Wagner E. K. 1984; A herpes simplex virus neurovirulence gene(s) function resides in a cloned DNA fragment. Herpes Virus Workshop, Seattle
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Timbury M. C. 1971; Temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 2. Journal of General Virology 13:373–376
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Wilkie N. M. 1973; The synthesis and substructure of herpesvirus DNA: the distribution of alkali-labile single strand interruptions in HSV-1 DNA. Journal of General Virology 21:453–467
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1305
Loading
/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-66-6-1305
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error