1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

Five monoclonal antibodies to the alkaline nuclease of herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 have been used in immunoperoxidase tests to demonstrate the nuclear localization of the enzyme within HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells and to purify the enzyme from cells infected with either virus by immunoadsorbant chromatography. Affinity chromatography with a P-labelled extract of HSV-2-infected cells has enabled us to demonstrate that the nuclease eluting from the immunoadsorbant is a phosphoprotein, hence confirming the nuclease to be identical to the phosphorylated polypeptide previously referred to as ICSP 22 (HSV-2) or ICP 19 (HSV-1). In addition, the results clearly demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies Q1, CC1 and CH2 are directed against HSV type-common epitopes while V1 and TT1 antibodies are against HSV-2-specific epitopes on the enzyme. Using the type-specific monoclonal antibodies in an immunoperoxidase test, the enzyme specified in cells infected with intertypic recombinants has been typed; correlation of these data with restriction endonuclease maps of the recombinants has enabled us to map the position of the active site of the nuclease gene to map units 0.168 to 0.184 on the genomes of both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Taken with the data mapping the mRNA encoding this enzyme, the nuclease active site can be mapped to 0.168 to 0.175 on the genome. Finally, the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunofluorescence tests on infected cells has demonstrated that the nuclease is synthesized within 2 h post-infection.

Keyword(s): 2 , alkaline , epitopes , HSV types 1 and nuclease
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1985-01-01
2021-10-17
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