1887

Abstract

SUMMARY

There was strong interference between various virulent and avirulent strains of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) and their respective defective interfering (DI) viruses but in other combinations interference was variable: it could be equally strong, weak or could not be demonstrated. On passage, this spectrum of interfering activity changed, some combinations showing greater interference than before and others less. Heterotypic interference between DI SFV, DI Sindbis virus and standard viruses was clearly demonstrated although this was strongest between DI SFV preparations and Sindbis standard virus than in the reciprocal combinations. Variation in interference between DI SFVs and different SFV strains was similar in magnitude to that between DI SFVs and Sindbis virus, suggesting that a similar DI RNA sequence is recognized by both viruses.

Keyword(s): DI viruses , SFV and Sindbis virus
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/content/journal/jgv/10.1099/0022-1317-65-6-1119
1984-06-01
2022-01-21
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